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Thread: Good beginner Neps

  1. #1

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    Anyway, I've enjoyed keeping the little lowly Gublers Nep that I own right now, and I've been thinking about maybe getting a real species nep(though a good hybrid might fit just find if a species isn't possible. Anyhow, Im looking for a plant that is

    Able to withstand relatively low humidity.

    Undemanding for a nep

    Stays low, without the tendency to turn into a vine(though if it does, you could always keep it at 2 feet or so by lopping off the top and making a cutting right?)Around 5-7 unches would be a good max pitcher size

    In my house, the summer temps are about 80 degrees, winter is around 60.....in winter we get lots of fog, so the plants should be able to cope with that too.

    Red color and/or patterning are a plus, but this is the last criteria. Shape doesn't matter until I see the plant you are suggesting!

    Thanks in advance!
    1 Nxventrata

    D. muscipula & D. muscipula 'Red Dragon'(barely)

    Sarracenia leucophylla(seedling)

    S. purpurea and Drosera filiformis filiformis/ intermedia seeds waiting to sprout.

    Drosera capensis

  2. #2

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    Best bets for your ideals, N."Judith Finn", N.spathulata
    Taproot, Anti-Flag, The Casualties, Alkaline Trio, Eleventeen, Deadsy, AFI...what's not to love?

  3. #3

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    N. maxima, but it gets kind of big. N. alata would be okay. N ventricosa is good, but it has pitchers under seven inches.
    Paradise found is paradise lost
    -The Future Of Life
    The world is just big enough for us to not realize how small it really is.

    Change is the only thing constant.

  4. #4
    Capslock's Avatar
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    For easy neps, I like:
    N. alata
    N. ventricosa
    N. x ventrata (hybrid mix of above)
    N. sanguinea
    N. x Judith Finn
    N. x Holland (This one might get big. I don't know yet!)
    Those are ones I've grown, but there are probably some others. I like N. maxima too, but a s carcinos says, they get big.

    Capslock
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    My photos are copyright-free and public domain

  5. #5
    O:-) trashcan's Avatar
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    As far as "easiness" goes, I recommend Nepenthes x ventrata. It is the hybrid of two pretty easy to grow plants, and it also has hybrid vigor to boot. It does grow quickly though, but you could always cut it back.

  6. #6
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    The N. Petra Giant hybrid (N. ventricosa "giant" x carunculata x talangensis) is a faster grower for me than even N. ventrata. It grew a 4+ foot long stem from a 8" tall cutting from July til November when I reduced it to cuttings. It's not very pretty however, looking like a rather bland N. ventrata when climbing (even under 400w metal halide the pitchers are no more colorful). Since the plant has been made into cuttings I will finally get to see at least a couple lower pitchers before it begins to climb again maybe they will be prettier than the uppers and necessitate keeping it pruned short. We'll see.
    Here's a 15-20 cm Petra Giant upper pitcher from summer (for me the pitchers did not get over 20 cm (8"):


    I grow it in my intermediate chamber with days 70-80*F and nights 65-70*F it's very weedy. It is grown in high humidity and bright lighting however, so I don't know how it'd do in less than ideal conditions.

  7. #7

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    I'll go with capslock. Nepenthes X ventrata or the way i call it "Nepenthes Weedii". it'll grow on almost any conditions.

    gus

  8. #8
    herenorthere's Avatar
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    As a beginner myself, I am supremely qualified to say what does well for a beginner [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img] . And I also vote for N. x Ventrata. Plus, one of them is named N. x Ventrata 'Red'. That's the one I have. The pitchers turn a deep maroon sort of red when exposed to lots of sun outdoors. Inside, in a sunny window, the new pitchers are more of a reddish olive. But don't expect many or large pitchers with low humidity. I also have a N. khasiana, N. maxima, N. sanguinea, and N. ventricosa, but only the N. khasiana and N. x. Ventrata have experienced my dry, indoor winter air.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

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