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Thread: Few new pics

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    swords's Avatar
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    Here finally is a fully formed, unburned N. campanulata pitcher. I tried growing this plant under 400W metal halide but it's pitchers always opened and the lids fried everytime. It loves the lowland chamber with 240W of fluorescents. The pitcher is only about an inch high but certainly has the shape I was looking for!


    N. sanguinea "orange" about 15 cm high


    N. "sanguinea red" about 12 cm high. To me this looks a whole lot like a hybrid between N. sanguinea and N. ramispina. Note the very thin peristome, more accentuated hip, overall thinner stature, higher held lid, dark brown/black speckles on the outter surface, clean colored waxy zone, very long spur at the base of the lid, all charachteristic of N. ramispina. the leaves resemble N. sanguinea though.



    Thanks for looking! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

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    Hey Josh,
    I have great luck (and I mean LUCK) with my campanulata. I just stuck in my highland chamber and VOOM! It just took off. So, I have it under 5 tubes of flourescent light, about 6 or 8" away (otherwise typical lowland conditions). However, I have noticed that my pitchers are coloring up. It does not appear to be burning, just a little reddening. Am I correct, or are these pitchers supposed to be all green with no red?
    17 Nash Rd.
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    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

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    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Hi Josh, plants look great as always. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img] I'd say the ID of them looks promising. N. ramispina IMHO has more of a bulbed throat in it's pitchers. I could be wrong tho. Are you sources reliable for these plants? You can PM if you wish.

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    Your N. campanulata is neat. That plant has such a delicate beauty about it.

    SF

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    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    nice campanulata! can you tell me about campanulata x veitchii? is it big?

    i REALLY like your campanulata.

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    Hi Schloaty,
    you mentioned the coloring up of the pitchers on your campanulata after moving it to the highland chamber. We have this phenomenon occur in winter in our greenhouse, and I believe its caused by the cooler nights. We get extremely colorful pitchers about this time of year when nights often drop below 60 F, (Tonight will be such a night) combined with sunny days at about 85 F.
    Trent

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    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Looks like both are N. sanguinea to me Josh. N. sanguinea is pretty variable since it is widespread and also seems to breed with other Nepenthes in the wild. N. sanguinea x ramispina looks alot more like N. ramispina than N. sanguinea and does not have a single long spur which is a trait of N. sanguinea.. Perhaps your plant has some other genes way in the background but I think it's safe to say it's N. sanguinea.

    N. campanulata are turning out interesting with some plants showing some color. Most are deffinately a nice pure green. Cool weather can cause red flushing on some plants as Trent mentions but I don't think this is the case with N. campanulata. Particularly when you have many plants growing side by side and some plants consistently produce some color all year. I have only seen color in the pitchers of certain plants and never in the leaves. Environmental factors I think would cause the leaves to show similar coloration.

    Dave you mention put it in your highland chamber but then said typical lowland conditions later in the sentence??

    The following plant for example shows this coloration consistently in all it's pitchers. The one in the photo was taken mid Summer.


    Tony



    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

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    swords's Avatar
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    The spur on the "red" sanguinea is very different than the one on the "orange" form. The red form is long but has about 5 points on it whereas the "orange" one has a very short spur with only about 3 points.

    I will wait a bit longer on the diagnosis of the sanguinea "red" and see what the next few pitchers bring as the plant gets larger, it's very easy growing in an intermediate chamber so I'm not complaining, just curious! I was looking at the two plants (N. ramispina and N. sanguinea "red") side by side and they do look similar in the aspects I mentioned above. I grant you, this plant doesn't look exactly like the hybrid of sanguinea x ramispina in Neps of Sumatra & Penninsular Malaysia. Perhaps what I have is a complex F2 natural hybrid (akin to the N. clipeata x eymae x clipeata syndrome) with some of the more pronounced ramispina traits having been repressed (such as the more tapered cylindrical upper half of the pitcher and more bulbous bottom). Regardless, I feel weird calling it a "N. sanguinea red" when it doesn't really match any images I've seen of it. If anyone can post images of a plant resembling this one I'd be very happy to take a look!

    Dustin, I have reliable sources for the plants but I believe these N. sanguineas I bought were seed grown and not TC and this opens the door for possibility.

    Rob, what have you got to say on this plant? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img]

    That's weird that people are growing campanulata as a highland plant when it's distribution is 300 m (lowland). I know it has a cliffside habit, which likely experiences slightly cooler temps due to air movement than plants on actual ground. But I would not think it would be suited to actual cool/cold highland conditions.

    Does it grow quickly in highland conditions? How cool is the highland conditions it's grown in?

    Hopefully the campanulata will develop color as it get's older, that looks very nice! The N. inermis pitchers have been getting a few red streaks here and there lately with the 5*C nights and days no higher than 22*C.

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