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Thread: Nepenthes sp. ? Doorman's Top #2

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    swords's Avatar
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    Hi folks, some of you may recall that I'm growing one of the unknown species of Nepenthes from Doorman's Top that was collected by Wistuba. The other Doorman's Top species (DT#1) seems to be taking a long time in TC my plant's been on backorder for a year.

    Speculation is that this may be N. papuana, which has an indistinct peristome with serrated teeth on the inner surface as we see here. However, so does N. lamii according to Jebb and Cheek. Here's the teeth of DT #2:


    Heres a few pics of the pitcher (overall height 4 cm / plant 12 cm diameter).




    Hope you like 'em, sorry for the blur they were hand held shots! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

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    O:-) trashcan's Avatar
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    Very interesting pitchers [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]. Do you have any shots of the leaves? I would be interested in seeing them if you do.
    By the way, are there fine hairs on the tendril?
    Thanks,
    Pat

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    Nice pics! Thanks for sharing. And when you say these are handheld pics, do you mean that you normally use a tripod? I always figured you must have a secret to your wonderful pictures!! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/cool.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/unclesam.gif[/img]
    I am back..

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    swords's Avatar
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    Trashcan. Yes, I can get some shots of the leaves, basically the leaves resemble young N. ramispina, maybe a bit more lanceolate. They start out dark green with red hues (like N. rajah's new leaves do when they're unfurling) and then they turn solid green when they harden off. Indeed, both the tendrils and pitcher body have velvety brown hairs, the leaves and lid are devoid of any sort of hairs or fringes. So far this plant is staying quite small but then I've not had it all that long. Both N. papuana and N. lamii are small species and the photo of the climbing pitcher of this plant on Wistubas site was I think only 7 or 9 cm high. The upper did not have the short brown fur on the pitcher body just the dark red maroon patterning that you can sort of see in the 2nd shot.

    Lithopsman, thanks for the compliments! I do normally use a tripod to get steadier, clearer shots. I wish I could get proper depth of field and crisp edges that Chien Lee and those other nature photographers get. Useful shots come for me by chance. The three pics above are the best out of about 10! It's definately worse with handheld photos, as even these "good" ones are pretty blurry (even before reducing them for the web). I'm looking around town to get a remote shutter switch so that once I get the image focused and steady with the tripod, I won't screw the focus up by touching the shutter release on the camera to take the photo.

    Is anybody else here growing this or know anything more about it? I did sell one of these to someone on Ebay last summer, are they here with us on the forums? I'd love to hear from you if ya're! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

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    Hi Swords,
    I think there's a very good chance that its N. papuana. Was the seed collected at the same altitude as the lamii? Danser describes N. papuana as being widely distributed at about 250 m altitude or lower, making it a lowland species, but one of German Nep sites shows papuana growing wild at something like 1500 meters. The lower pitchers were dark in color. squat and round, reminding me of N. merrilliana. Your picture looks a lot like a juvenile trap of the same species. But then, there was still some doubt as to whether these higher altitude plants really were papuana-they did fit Danser's description, but seemed to be in the wrong place. Could very well be that N. papuana has a wide altitudinal range like N. alata and N. reinwardtiana.
    Have you emailed your pictures to Wistuba for his opinion?

    Trent

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    Hi Josh,
    I found the pictures at Joachim-nerz website under N. papuana. You should check it out if you haven't already. I believe you have the same species-whether it's papuana or not.

    By the way, you mentioned depth of field problems in your photography. A lot of this has to do with subject size-the smaller the subject the more you have a problem with shallow depth of field, and the problem is compounded by increasing focal length of the lens, as is camera shake from hand-holding. I think you're doing a great job with a little digital camera!

    Trent

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (swords @ Jan. 16 2004,00:28)]Lithopsman, thanks for the compliments! I do normally use a tripod to get steadier, clearer shots. I wish I could get proper depth of field and crisp edges that Chien Lee and those other nature photographers get. Useful shots come for me by chance. The three pics above are the best out of about 10! It's definately worse with handheld photos, as even these "good" ones are pretty blurry (even before reducing them for the web). I'm looking around town to get a remote shutter switch so that once I get the image focused and steady with the tripod, I won't screw the focus up by touching the shutter release on the camera to take the photo.
    Hi Josh,

    have you ever tried using the self timer of your camera? I'm also using a tripod and the self timer to get maximum sharpeness. All mechanical oscillations of the camera have stopped after few seconds and pictures are much sharper then.

    Also very high light levels help, because the camera can use a smaller aparture and longer exposure times.

    FYI: My N. dubia in a 5.5cm diameter pot. Photo taken with tripod and timer. It was taken in low light environment and exposure time was 1/4s:

    [img]http://home.**********.com/joachim/N_dubia_160104.jpg[/img]
    Cheers Joachim

    P.S.: Nice plant BTW!

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