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Thread: nepenthes grafting

  1. #1

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    Hi everybody,

    Just curious to know if somebody has already experienced grafting nepenthes. Gordon Cheers, on page 42 of his book, mentions the topic, but it remains quite theoretical to me...

    Thanks already,

    Greetings from Switzerland,

    Olivier

  2. #2
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    I would too, have to see it to belive it. Peronsally the results of grafting seem quite probable to me personally. As long as you have healthy tissue and a reliable attachment site I think you could graft a slower growing rarer plant like N. villosa onto a more easier to grow plant like N. hamata for an example. I'm by no means an expert at this but merely adding a bit of input from what I do know about grafting.

    Cheers!
    Dustin

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    I think Cliff Dodd has successfully done this.

    Regards,

    Joe

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    Hmm, what little I've read on grafting is from Bonsai and that is so that strange cultivars of Acer palmatum can be more easily circulated since they aparently don't root very well.

    When you do a cutting (of any plant) the cutting retains the genetic information from the parent plant which includes pitcher shape, pitcher color and plant growth rate. A cutting is the original "clone". I don't think that moving a slow plant and affixing it into the vine of a faster growing plant would do anything for the growth speed but I may well be wrong having never done it myself. It may be possible that the tissues will intermingle and the nutrient uptake may be different on a larger root system, but I don't know if it would actually effect the metabolism of the grafted plant so that it made leaves and pitchers faster since that is genetically controlled.

    It would be nice to have someone whos done it stop in and show some photos and measurements of such a slow on fast experiment!

  5. #5

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    i was thinking about this a few weeks ago. maybe someone can make a nepenthes bush, filled with many grafted plants of different species. that would be a sight to see! it would need quite a large root system thought. Zongyi
    What you want to do is illeagle here in Canada.
    Email does not work! Use PM or yangzongyi@hotmail.com instead.

  6. #6

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    Many years ago I have succesfull grafted some Nepenthes .
    I tried to graft N .species (nothing special) onto rooted hybrids .
    The thought was ,to keep cuttings of difficult rooting species alive.
    The technic is nothing special for me ,because I am nursery man and grafting trees and roses is a part of my work.
    If anybody wants to trie it,here are some things which should be known:

    There are two ways for grafting plants .
    1.You graft onto a rooted plant(can be a hybrid)and want to keep this alive ,so that the 2 plants stay together for the rest of their life.
    This is the normal way (Fruit trees and roses are grafted this way)
    2.You graft onto a rooted plant and do not[U] want that the rooted one stays alive .This kind of grafting is used, if you want to root something, what is very hard to root and to keep the upper part alive, till it can produce own roots (sometimes this needs 1 or 2 years .Chinese tree paeonies are grafted this way.)
    After the the plant has established the (helping )root dies off.

    Dustin says :Would be gould to graft N. villosa onto N. hamata.
    I do not really think that he wants to cut his(really nice ) N. hamata back and wants to trie it (and where do you want to get a cutting of N.villosa,You can ask Jeff for one (;-)).And there is also an other thing what makes it technically impossible.Both parts have to be nearly similar in diameter and I would think a rosetted plant can not be used .

    Grafted plants do never mix anything together ,it is only a way to proagate a plant.Althought grafted plants in most cases have other characteristics than seed grown ones ,but only in the fastness of growing and compatiliby of different soil conditions,and sometimes in color.

    Something to the way to graft :
    1.Only graft in spring when groth comes back to the plant .(not in middle of winter)
    2.Choose a plant to graft on ,N.ventricosa should be very good.
    3.Take a cutting of good groth .
    4.Take a very sharp knife ,and cut both crossways (3 -4 cm long cut).
    5.Place both onto each other,very carfully.
    7.Fix them with a rubber band.Work clean, no dirt should get into the wound.
    8.Close the wound with wax or something similar
    9.Wait 4-6 weeks to see if it had worked .
    10. Good Luck.

    I will try this again in spring with one or two plants,we will see.

    Zongyi:Principially it is possible to graft more the one species on one plant, but I think in case of nepenthes it will not really work (but nice idea to think about)

    I do not have any pics of my grafted plants ,please excuse.(Too long ago)

    Christian

  7. #7
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Ha ha Christian! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/tounge.gif[/img] Well, I WAS thinking of cutting it back, but since 2 dormant nodes waay down near the original plant tissue (when I bought it) have activated naturally so I'm letting the main vine go on the N. hamata now.

    As for the grafting o the villosa onto the N. hamata, it was a mere suggestion for if it could be accomplished, perhaps N. villosa could be grown to maturity this way much quicker. On the other hand, the temperamental factors of the plants might stil be retained and you would have gained nothing besides a neat grafted Nepenthes of 2 rare and beautiful species.

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    You forgot to mention to not touch the tissue as the oils on your hands will prevent miosis(sp) of the cambium layers,also you should place a plastic bag over the scion to help increase humidity wich appears vital to new grafts of houseplants,also the scion must be LESS then 10% of the size of the stock AND you can graft a smaller plant onto a larger plant as long as the cambial tissue matches in at least one side cambial contact is requiered for a successful graft.
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/pondboy/Neps/Neps%20sig..JPG[/img]

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