User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 9

Thread: Nepenthes alata

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Quebec city, Qc, Canada
    Posts
    243
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Angry

    Hi there,

    first, here is the patient:

    [img]http://home.**********.com/quizibo/Nep.JPG[/img]

    This plant of Nepenthes alata is my very first Nepenthes, that I have for more than 5 years old, and knew, as you can see, more glorious years...

    With several moving and disturbing situation here is the result... As you can see at the tiny blue arrow at the upper left, the new leaves are way shorter and curled, slightly 'deformed' (sorry, it can be a wrong word). The second blue arrow (right, at the bottom of the picture) try to show how some leaves are curling up on themselves.

    Now, the growing situation: after passing few month in a sunny sunroom, I move here in Rimouski, where it had been placed in a medium lit living room. It was still pitchering, and developing normally but very slowly (non-optimal condition). It began to etiolate, more like a vine growth. Then the growth completly stopped.

    When I made my new larger setup in my basement, I place it there. There is a daily humidity which vary from 50% to 75%, 400W HPS, but the plants is not directly under it (but it received a good amount of light anyway). A ultrasonic humidifier is placed right next to my Nepenthes, and they are growing normally if I can say so, even a stunted N. ramispina come back to its growth this week under these condition, but for the N.alata, it is just worst every week.

    The new pitchers aborted even before forming, the tip of the leaves are drying. There is some brownish spot under some leaves. The growth never came back. The soil mix is half peat/sand mix, 1/4 perlite, 1/4 vermiculite (if I remember well). No pest is visible.

    I now moved it to my windowsill, to have a more constant look over its situation, as shown on the picture.

    Any input on what it can be, and how I can set my lovely nep back to growth?

  2. #2
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Alexandria Bay, NY Z-5a
    Posts
    6,341
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It's classic leaf curl. Perhaps it is too wet and root rot may be setting in? Was it nice and healthy before it was moved to this area?

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Quebec city, Qc, Canada
    Posts
    243
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I find the curve too 'pronunced' to be normal, if I compare it to its usual shape when the leaves are unfolding.

    The plant was kind of slow growing (it was in november, so it can explain a bit of this), it was healthy, but could have been a lot more healthy tough (like in a greenhouse instead of a living room ).

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Quebec city, Qc, Canada
    Posts
    243
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Oh! And I forgot to add: the soil was on the dry side, and the plant has been repotted lately, last spring. for the roots, I don't know how they are actually, but I was thinking to try a bit of Superthrive, even if the reports are very unconclusive on this stuff regarding neps, but it could help the roots for sure!

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Western MI USA
    Posts
    1,473
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think it is just shocked. Or the soil is too dry, let it adjust to one spot for a few weeks before you jump to any concluesions
    There is no item greater in value than life, for without life value would cease to exist.
    My Grow List

  6. #6
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Alexandria Bay, NY Z-5a
    Posts
    6,341
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You could try superthrive. I fin it works best on stressed out plants. If you give it to a healthy Nepenthes, its effect will be dull if noticable at all. This stuff is formulated to work on plants that need improvement not ones that have already improved.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Palm Springs, CA
    Posts
    840
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    From my short time growing these plants, I have noticed that the leaves will start to look a bit shriveled if you let the plant get too dry for too long, well before you see anything dying, or turning brown. It could have caused some root damage between drying and rewatering/repotting. That would definately cause stunted growth along with being moved about. Neps really like to find a place to call home and sit for the rest of there lives.

    The most important thing, especially if it did go dry, is not too overwater. That's a big killer of plants all over the world. A plant drying causes a bit of root loss while the plants trying to take the healthiest roots and even more of its energy and dig deeper in search of the moisture that could hold it a few more days. When the roots dry up a bit, then get flash flooded, that's when rot sets in. If rot begins in the root ball at the base of the stem the plant is surely a goner unless you use it for cuttings before the uppermost nodes take leave with the rest of the plant.

    Don't overcare for it. Give it a shot of superthrive. And most importantly, leave it alone. Nepenthes need to be loved from afar.
    Lithops care info: If you take care of it, it will die.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Quebec city, Qc, Canada
    Posts
    243
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Since I still have to learn a lot in Nepenthes and esp. Superthrive: should I apply it as foliar misting or to the roots?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •