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Thread: Lowland vs Highland

  1. #9

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    Hmmm, okay. I'll keep that in mind. It's not low humidty per say, just not nere 100% like my highlands. It adapted fast though so I may continue to try and harden it off. From what I have read, this is a very variatable plant so the individual clone can make a big difference. I'll wait to get any pricey lowlands till I have been able to tweek this guy into a new leaf/trap per week, that is sort of my standard min for considering a plant healthy. It might already be at that point, it's hard to tell because it doesn't have a bunch of mid stage growth like my highlands do, insted it came withh 100% fully developed leaves and traps not counting the tips new fuzzy point which I consider 0 development. Now that I have it, it's pealing off new leaves, but it seems inclined to swell them as they come as oppose to making leaves fast and then inflating the traps a few down from the top. It also takes a while for the traps to swell 'cause they are so gosh darn big in conparison to the rest of the plant.

    Oh well... so what humidity is good for lowlands?
    There is no item greater in value than life, for without life value would cease to exist.
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  2. #10

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    Hi Darcie,
    Glad to see you're having success with raffs. We've noticed they do enjoy cool nights, despite being lowlanders. We've also noted that lower humidity will shorten the life of the pitchers. Pitcher longevity seems to be the Achilles Heel of raffs, and it is definitely tied to RH.
    I agree with Tony about other lowlanders. We find raffs and ampullarias are fairly tolerant, and seem to enjoy, coolish nights, but bicalcarata can be fussy, depending on the clone. Northiana tolerates coolish nights but really objects to drops in humidity.
    I'm beginning to believe there is a set of temperatures that many species will thrive in: both lowland and highland, as long as humidity requirements are met.
    By the way, the N. Edinensis is capable of very large, tough looking, colorful pitchers once it gets going!

    Trent

  3. #11
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Darcie, i wouldn not let RH go below 65-70% for lowlanders. They like it very hot and steamy, almost like a sauna.

  4. #12

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    Hey Darcie,

    Rafflesiana can be a good lowlander to try as a houseplant. I grow one indoors and one outdoors. The outdoors guy is going through winter conditions now. He's taking a bit of a beating, but should make it to summer. I'm having good success with these lowlanders as windowsill plants: sumatrana, ampullaria, truncata, distillatoria, veitchii (lowland), albomarginata, gracilis just for starters. I grow some others, but these guys have proven to be "put me anywhere and I'll grow" attitude. Most of those are fairly economical to try. I agree with Tony that bicalcarata and northiana are challenging. I'm growing both now as windowsill plants and they're hanging in there. Intermediates make good windowsill specimens too!

    Good growin'
    Joel

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