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Thread: Lowland vs Highland

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    Unhappy

    As many of you already may know, most of my plants are Highlands. N. ventricosa and N. sanguinea are my oldest plants and I always thought they were easy to grow, so much so that I feared lowland plants. However, my trip to the Meijer Gardens last month prooved tempting and I picked up an N. raffsomethingorother(sorry I have not memorised the spelling yet). Aside from lower humidity, the growing conditions for it and my highlands are identical. That is, it's generally cool with colder nights, but my N. raff is growing at an insain rate, almost as fast as my N. sanguinea (which has a very small window of "happy" growing conditions). It's already making traps that are LARGER then the ones it made while it was in the humid greenhouses of the Meijer gardens. What is up with this? I thought the difference in growing highlands and lowlands was mostly temperature based, not humidity. I know highlands are more picky about the high levels at night, but shouldn't both be fond of higher humidity overall?

    Well, any imput you have would be great because I want to get some more lowlands (yay fanged monkey pot), but only if you think this is normal and my N. raff. isn't a freak... When I got it, I almost regretted it because it was sort of blah to me, now I look at it and it's become my most beautifull Nep with it's new gigantic bright red to burgendy gradient spotting over it's frilly pitchers (once my others recover it may loose that title however)... did I mention the traps are huge? Lol, sorry, I just can't get over the size increase.
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    Darcie,
    This surprises me a bit, as N. Rafflesiana (which is what I think you're referring to) generally likes it really humid. They are, however, reputed to be able to take cooler temperatures even though they're classified as lowlanders. I have not attempted this myself, though, so I don't know that for sure.



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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (schloaty @ Feb. 26 2004,17:08)]Darcie,
    This surprises me a bit, as N. Rafflesiana (which is what I think you're referring to) generally likes it really humid. They are, however, reputed to be able to take cooler temperatures even though they're classified as lowlanders. I have not attempted this myself, though, so I don't know that for sure.
    Thats the one, and yah, that is what I thought, but aside from the older traps getting a little brown on the edges prematurely, it's adapted really well to the moderit humidity I have it in. . . I don't have a recent picture, but to give you an idea of how it looks[img]http://home.**********.com/darcie/images/raff021504.gif[/img]... it's much nicer now.
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    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Looks happy to me. The key to this guy is high RH and warm temperatures.

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    Hey Darcie,

    What's the leafspan on that beauty?

    SF

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    hmmm, well, I think the longest full grown one is about 5 inches, but I'll have to check when I get home. It's just a baby, but it has 2 rossets already and is fairly large in conparison to the others I've seen for sale.

    I've got to get more pictures of my plants, a lot of them are looking real nice right now... I wish my N. ventricosa hadn't lost it's growth point, it has just started to recover from it's relocating and make nice big traps :P But the baby shoots have nice immature traps.

    Edit: Oh hey, I have pictures of my N. x edsomethingerother and my N. ventricosa from the same day. Might as well show them... although don't expect a whole lot.[img]http://home.**********.com/darcie/images/ed021504.gif[/img][img]http://home.**********.com/darcie/images/ventricosa1.gif[/img] If you look closely at the N. ventricosa you can see all three branches. The oldest is the one with it's head cut off, then you can see the slightly smaller leaves with juvenile pitchers pokeing out a little to the left and then right under that, just barly visable is was looks like a little leaf laying on the soil just to the right of the juvenile branch, that is my newest baby one. The big part doesn't look too good right now, but if you take into account that the second youngest part is less then 4 months old and already around 4 inches tall the plant is growing really well [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img] The N. x Edinsomething is a really young cutting from a chunk of mature vine. Seeing as I just got it and it only actually has 2 real fully extended leaves I think it is in good shape. I'll try and get a pricture of the little ugly one I forget what it is and of my N. sangiunea over spring break [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]
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    N. rafflesiana is a fairly durable plant. I had a seedling growing on my East windowsill for a long while and it grew fine. I would call the conditions intermediate to cool with dry air. Pitchers were sporadic and not very long lived but the plant looked fine. N. truncata is another lowland plant that can take such conditions without too much difficulty

    I would however not recommend cold temperatures and moderate humidity for most lowland plants. The majority will kick up their heals and get very unhappy very fast. So I would be very careful about translating success with N. rafflesiana in your conditions to potential success with other lowlands like N. bicalcarata.

    Tony
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    Somewhat Unstable superimposedhope's Avatar
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    I had a N. rafflesiana several years ago befor I even really knew what a pitcher plant was, and it lived next to a sliding glass door in a Nebraska winter with the heat register on the other side and like almost zero humidity and it grew there verry well with new pitchers almost bi-weekly until the following summer I put it in direct sunlight without acclimation or added humidity. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/sad.gif[/img] that was the end of that. It did very well with my abuse.

    Joe
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