User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 9 to 16 of 31

Thread: N. truncata

  1. #9
    Somewhat Unstable superimposedhope's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Where the Slime Live; Where the Slime Breed
    Posts
    1,697
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Post

    I use a submergeable heater in the water. the "sun " lamps are those Chroma 50's. I am just adding a little extra color to the spectrum. At night the temp drops to 85 or so the heating register (for the house) also sits right behind the tank. Does it sound like maybe a heat or humidity problem? I thought maybe a rot or it kinda looks like the rust spotting. I don't know though.
    As for the medium, I already have charcoal, pine bark, redwood bark, fir bark, osmunda fiber, spanish moss, sphagnum moss, sheet moss, perlite, ?lite(used in concrete, expanded clay product), leaf mold, leaf mulch, lichens, and of course dirt. I am one of those with a recipe for all my mediums.
    I appreciate all the help. It seems to be trying real hard, I just don't know how or if I should help it. There's also a light yellowing at the margins. Iron?

    Any help is still welcome

    Thanks
    Joe
    \"There is nothing here of interest to any nation, as a matter of fact there is nothing here but humans!\"

  2. #10
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Far Away NY
    Posts
    4,640
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I am inclined to believe too hot and too humid with lack of air circulation and potential root problem. Or the excessive temperature and humidity has caused disease in the growth point/stem of the plant.

    A mix of some fir bark, sphagnum, and perlite is all you need. It should drain quickly and be loose and airy but also hold a good amount of moisture. The potting mix should be kept fairly moist but not sopping wet all the time. Leaf mulch might be too rich or cause disease problems as it decomposes.

    Can you explain what you mean by 'brown on the main stem'? Do you mean the part connecting the leaf to the center of the plant? or the tendril hanging off the end of the leaf? The tendril portion is usually brown from fuzzy hair covering it. If it the section connecting the green leaf blade to the center of the stem then there is a major problem.
    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  3. #11
    Somewhat Unstable superimposedhope's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Where the Slime Live; Where the Slime Breed
    Posts
    1,697
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Post

    It is brown/black from the tip of the tendril all the way to the base. The stem that connects the leafy portion to the center of the plant. The central "vein" that turns into the tendril. The actual leaf tissue is still green though as well as the other leaves and stems. This is only on the new shoot. Although a portion of another leaf is orangey/rust colored.

    Thanks
    Joe
    \"There is nothing here of interest to any nation, as a matter of fact there is nothing here but humans!\"

  4. #12
    Odysseus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    341
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The portion of the other leaf that is orange/rust colored, without a picture is hard to say, but my guess is that its the natural red coloration of the leaves. Does it look like this:

    [img]http://home.**********.com/odysseus/MyNEPTank_Leftred.jpg[/img]

    Does your orange seem like this?

    Your other problems do narrow down to too much humidity, heat, and the possible root problems. Give your plant some Air circulation and lessen the heat during the day and we'll see if the plant's soil medium is causing it. However, I would change the soil soon, since your ingredients may have caused the problem and could be too much to risk with time.
    Odysseus
    Wife and I in the Netherlands. Sure miss living out there.

    My growlist
    A list of beginner CPs

  5. #13
    Odysseus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    341
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Good luck! Keep us posted. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]
    Odysseus
    Wife and I in the Netherlands. Sure miss living out there.

    My growlist
    A list of beginner CPs

  6. #14
    Somewhat Unstable superimposedhope's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Where the Slime Live; Where the Slime Breed
    Posts
    1,697
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Post

    The coloring could be that, though its hard to tell. It seems in alot of the pics I've been seeing the light looks heavy in red spectrum like a High Pressure Sodium bulb. My light is extremely white and very intense more like a Metal Halide. Is this a problem? Like I posted before mine is 6500K and like 7000 lumens. Very efficient energy wise anyway(65wtt).
    I'll try lowering some heat and humidity. As well as taking out the mulch. I know the mulch works great for epiphytes in general. I know some Neps are epi but I dont know if the same rules apply.I'll go with the Sphagnum 70%-perlite10%-bark10%-lava or pumice something??10%

    Thanks guys
    Joe
    \"There is nothing here of interest to any nation, as a matter of fact there is nothing here but humans!\"

  7. #15
    Capslock's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    3,088
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Joe,
    Your white light is actually better than the red/yellow tint of the High Pressure Sodiums.

    I'm with everyone else, lower your temperatures, and open the lid so there's good air circulation. You don't need humidity and temperatures that high. Good luck, and keep at it!

    Capslock
    Malo Periculosam Libertatem Quam Quietum Servitium

    My photos are copyright-free and public domain

  8. #16

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
    Posts
    2,974
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think that will work well enough. Some of the largest pitchers I have seen photos of were grown in fairly organic mixes. Mike . from CP Jungles uses 100% LF sphagnum and Steve LaWarre uses 2:2:2:1 peat, sphagnum, bark and charcoal. That makes more than 50% of the mix LF sphagnum and peat. A lot of people would not have such a high composition of those two. Both have greenhouse space, which may factor in(air curculation).

    Regards,

    Joe

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •