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Thread: N. truncata

  1. #17
    Somewhat Unstable superimposedhope's Avatar
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    Hi guys(girls included),
    I vented the tank and that also lowered the humidity. I also repotted to all NZ sphagnum. Speaking of which does it really make a difference to CP's to have "New Zealand(NZ)" sphagnum or does it matter?
    Any way we'll see in a week or so, I tried not to move the roots themselves. They look ok to me, very wirey/bristle like. The soil that it was shipped in is very broken down, it was sphagnum-now it is a mush mess and holding water too well. When I first got it, I left the original soil in but upon repotting today I noticed the whole pot to be extremely soggy though it is not in standing water. I removed the mulch and the original mushy mess and it is more free draining now. Though I am new to Neps as a grower in general I think that might have been part of the problem the mush was sooooo soggy. I will keep updated on how it did or did'nt work.

    Thanks
    Joe
    \"There is nothing here of interest to any nation, as a matter of fact there is nothing here but humans!\"

  2. #18

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    Michael Catalani from CP Jungle uses the Wisconsin stuff(judging by the pics) and Peter D'Amato says he has noticed no diff in growth in camparison. I love the feel of NZ(Chilean is nice too) and it's really good with Drosera, as it tends to not grow. Wisconsin usually has so may sticks and stuff in it and the others are so clean. Sorry for this crude analogy, but when I look at NZ, I feel it's so clean and fluffy, I could wipe my butt with it. Again, sorry for that, and if I ever send anyone sphagnum, you can be sure it has not been used in such a manner. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]
    In short, if you can't get the good stuff cheap, by all means use the cheaper stuff.

    Regards,

    Joe

  3. #19

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    I think you've you've got some good advice from some experienced growers. One question occurs to me though, are you sure it's a lowland N. truncata and not a highland one? If it turns out that you have one of the highland variety (relatively recently introduced to cultivation) then that would explain a lot with the conditions you report in your enclosure!

    If the plant has a lot of hairs on the leaf blade (either on top or underneath) then it's highland. Also, was the pitcher that was on the plant when you got it colorful? The highland variety in general exhibits a lot more coloration on the pitcher body than it's lowland counterpart.
    Rob Cantley
    Nep Nut in Sri Lanka
    http://www.borneoexotics.com

  4. #20
    Somewhat Unstable superimposedhope's Avatar
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    Honestly I did'nt expect to get this much help. Thanks guys.

    Well, for starters the one I got, I got from Cook's and it was like $15.99 or something close. If I remember right the highland is like $200. The pitcher that came on it still has not opened and is bright green with light pink/red veining beginning to show now, mainly toward the mouth. I cut the the whole new leaf off because it had gone totally black on and in the center of the stem and was mushy, while the leaf part that unrolls never did go black.It was dead base to tendril tip. One of the other leaves is getting orangey colored and kinda leathery and tough on one side of the leaf. I have done as directed.ie venting, repotting. The terrarium is a steady 80degF. with 80%humidity.

    Another ? is: I have already bought an N.veitchii and an N.merilliana before these other problems occured. I did'nt buy more while this is one is in trouble. I bought them a few weeks ago with delayed shipping, they won't be here till like mid march. Am I going to have problems with them as well or are they more "beginner" Neps? I like big plants.

    Thanks
    Joe
    \"There is nothing here of interest to any nation, as a matter of fact there is nothing here but humans!\"

  5. #21
    Odysseus's Avatar
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    I like big plants too! I don't have a LARGE nepenthes yet, but I do have one nep that is getting FAR too large for my 10 gallon tank. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img] The largest pitcher is four inches tall. This picture doesn't do it justice but here you go, my largest Nep at this moment. We all know that Nepenthes can quickly overtake your life! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]

    [img]http://home.**********.com/odysseus1/UN_Contrast_760.jpg[/img]

    Please ignore the perlite and Soda bottle pot. I received several Neps at one tme and quickly potted these up. At the time, I was falsely told to layer the bottom of pots with an inch or so of perlite to provide drainage. I now know that the idea of a seperate bottom layer of perlite actually HINDERS drainage, I would've transplanted the Nepenthes, only the last two months it has grown 6 pitchers. All pitchers were the plants first! Thus, it was tough to want to disturb anything. Sure, I will be replanting it soon as the plant outgrows the tank it's in. And that will be in only a month or less! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img] Just make sure no one sees the perlite layer and gets any ideas. DON"T DO IT! It doesn't help drainage AT all!
    Odysseus
    Wife and I in the Netherlands. Sure miss living out there.

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  6. #22
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Joe is right on what Michael uses, he had every plant no matter how rare or valuable it was, all in the same darn thing...domestic sphagnum. Thats all. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img] Simple simple simple. I would like to add that indeed most of my best Nepenthes grow in 100% sphagnum moss. My large N. bical is in a pot of pure sphagnum as is my N. rafflesiana 'singapore giant'. I also belive N. hamata is in pure sphagnum...I may switch back to sphagnum now the more I think about it. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

  7. #23

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    Making decent, well-draining Nepenthes soil never really seemed too much of a chore for me. I think it's kindof fun. I never get too carried away, but I like using some lava rock, orchid bark, and charcoal (this more towards the bottom of the pot) with a base of LFS. That isn't all I use, but those are the "general principals."
    I just love the way Nepenthes soil looks... a while ago I bought a Nepenthes from California Carnivores. I took a picture of the potting medium spread across a sheet of paper and it looks quite purdy.

    Regarding the leaf mulch... I liked the idea of using leaf mulch. I have never thought about trying it as a top layer to a Nepenthes mix. Many Nepenthes grow naturally, as most of you know, in soil that has a substantial top-layer of fallen leaves. It seems like adding leaves to the mix may better simulate the natural soil of SOME Nepenthes.
    The only issues I can think of are
    A: The composition and realative cleanliless of the leaf mulch
    B: Using leaf mulch in an area that, as much as we may try, still is far from a natural Nepenthes habitat. I could see problems arising in using leaf mulch in an enclosed environment such as a tank or, to a lesser extent, a greenhouse. There may be more of a potential for mold and... well, general nastiness.

    -Trev

  8. #24
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Hi Trev,

    I would agree on point B. Duplicating a natural condition is not always the best plan when growing a plant in captivity. It is impossible to duplicate all the conditions that makes it work for mother nature. As soon as we try growing a plant in our care beyond it's natural habitat, things go out the window and what might actually be a positive thing in nature can turn to a negative.

    Alot of people think they MUST duplicate everything found in nature to be successful. This is not correct. What is important is close observation, experimentation, and adjustment to improve ones growing skills over time. Nature gives us a general set of conditions to point us in the right direction but that's about it.

    And the perplexing part is that even in cultivation no two growers conditions are all exactly alike so comparing between two growers and what works for one and the other should only be done on a general scale again.

    Tony



    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

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