User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 9 to 16 of 23

Thread: N. ampullaira: is a natural setting possible?

  1. #9

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    68
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Good points Tony, thanks. I've also got a 30 gal (36x12x17) tank that I could use. It was recently setup for a Thai stream biotope, but I'm not sure if I want to continue on with it at this point...so it may end up empty before long. This is shallower in depth than the 80 gal, which is 24" deep.

    I checked Capslock's thread and looked up the LOA FloureX fixtures. Those bulb would work well (seems less restrike with the bulb configuration), but the catch seems to be that LOA claims that the bulb must be used within their respective fixtures, which is around $35 a pop. I'm sure it has to do with ballast type to run the bulbs at their proper wattages.

    If I went ahead with your suggestion of keeping the amp potted, but buried it in the substrate, I assume pitchers would break the bounds of the pot and still continue to spread throughout the substrate? What would I need to do if I decided to remove the pot from the tank? I assume terra-cotta would be best in this situation (moisture retention, breathability, etc.)?

    Thanks again!

  2. #10

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    SoCal (born in utah)
    Posts
    1,140
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I like Tony's idea. Sink the pot in soil and put a topsoil on. That would look pretty good. But use a big pot so the basal shoots and offshoots can come up.

  3. #11

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    68
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]But use a big pot so the basal shoots and offshoots can come up.
    So do the offshoots spread beneath the surface of the soil...or along the top? I assumed it was along the top and they would just grow over the rim and proceed into the surrounding substrate. Am I wrong?

  4. #12

    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    651
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    No, youre right, they start a "carpet" and when they do it spreads along the top of the soil, my amp is currently making a carpet now, for some time now, ill see if i can take a photo, its really cool!

    but when they do start to make a carpet, what i read was that you need to let the main stem keep growing, if you cut the "mother" plant then the plants in the carpet will grow taller

    i learned this from Josh, i think he was going to experiment that if you cut the main stem to see if the others will grow or if you can just cut the tip off and itll still grow as a carpet or something like that, hopefully #### chime in =/
    Expression = Maneuverability x Coiffure squared

  5. #13

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    68
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have been thinking about this a little more and wanted your opinions. Due to space issues, the tank I may end up using would be a 30 gal (36x12x17). Would this last very long if the amp was the only plant in the tank?

    If I go with the potted method, would you suggest terra cotta or plastic? I'm assuming terra cotta as it can retain moisture and allows a little more breathing action within the walls of the pot (beneficial for Nepenthes roots?).

    My idea is to not really have a substrate in the tank of much depth. I plan on putting some wood on the bottom, maybe a tangle of roots in one corner that creep along the length of the tank. I would set the pot in the corner among the roots, then fill around it and the rest of the tank with some sphagnum and maybe a little substrate on the bottom (1/2" or so). A large majority of the tank would have leaf litter. My hope is that the amp would begin to spread throughout the litter and debris and create plenty of lower pitchers emerging up out of the litter.

    How does this sound? Comments? Critiques?

  6. #14
    swords's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Cernunnos Woods
    Posts
    8,120
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    This would be a beautiful terrarium! I say go for it! N. ampullaria is a very easy growing plant and does indeed spread like you see in the wild nepenthes photos. I have a 6" pot full of about 20 basal rosettes which had a meter long vine which I just cut off a while ago. The sad part is N. ampullarias don't sprout from dormant nodes - so the cutting wound up being a waste! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/sad.gif[/img] Anyway it's been about 3 months and the clump of basal rossttes is still staying small and none have started to elongate yet here's a picture of part of the clump:


    I think the terrarium would be excellent, just make sure you use a lot of light which will not only help with faster growth but also supply the extra heat that N. ampullaria likes. As far as drainage if you set it up to have a way to drain it so it's not constantly watterlogged. I don't think there would be a problem with a bit of extra wetness because it grows in peat swamps and heath forests which are occasionally flooded. Maybe get a couple different color forms (red green and spotted) and let them all carpet together!

    Good luck!

  7. #15

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    68
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the support and info Josh! You've got a beautiful plant in that pic.

    I have a few questions for you. Would you suggest keeping it potted as well, or planting it in the substrate? Being a newbie to Nepenthes, I'm still a bit unfamiliar as to what consitutes "bright light." What would you suggest, some kind of compact flourescent retro?

    The only other way I could see setting it up with a somewhat manageable substrate would be with a shallow false bottom, just enough to let the water collect underneath and allow me to siphon it out occasionally. I assume an ultrasonic mister would be extremely beneficial to this setup?

    I like your suggestion of keeping a couple different color forms together in the same tank. I am planning it around the speckled form...but adding some different color/textures in there would look really nice.

  8. #16
    swords's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Cernunnos Woods
    Posts
    8,120
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi there, is this a standard 30 gallon which is 36" x 12" x 12"? or a 29 gallon which is 30" L x 12"w x 18"H?

    If it's a terrarium of this size 4x 24" fluorescents will do just fine but indeed if you have a Power Compact setup of at least 100 watts that can be evenly distributed over the tank (such as 2x 65 watt fluorex worklight bulbs) I say go for it the plant will love it! I use 6 x 40 watt fluorescent tubes over my 75 gallon lowland tank (where that ampullaria grows). My suggeston is to get as much light over your nepenthes as possible. While plants like N. ampullaria and N. bicalcarata are considered lowlight they do need bright light to pitcher well and grow quickly as possible. Lowlight in a terrarium (say one or two 20 watt flourescents) VS lowlight or semi shade in the wild is much different.

    As I already mentioned the lights will also heat things for you up during the day which really helps lowlanders with growth speed. N. amp is rather slow to begin but once it gets to about 30 cm and starts creeping along the ground then shoots pop up all the time!

    Yes, if you can build a false bottom of eggcrate and PVC plastic piping that would be ideal! I use the false bottom method for my 75 gallon lowland tank and it works excellent. An ultrasonic humidifier isn't necessary for this kind of setup and will actually make things too wet in such a small space. The natural evaporation from the soil surface in conjunction with keeping the lid closed and covered except while servicing the plant will keep your humidity high enough in the 80%+ range.

    If you were to setup as a false bottom I do not think it would be necessary to use a pot since the water would be drained away. Leave the water in the false bottom until it reaches the bottom of the eggcrate then drain it. But leave enough in there so the water will evaporate and will pass through the soil and transpire into the air inside the terrarium. The plant could also much more easily grow in the carpeting fashion you desire if planted directly in the soil of a false bottom tank, I'm almost tempted to give this a go myself! I've got an empty but equipped 29 gallon...

    My suggestion for the soil in this setup would be to use a lot of freely draining materials for the substrate such as american spahgnum moss sold by Mosser Lee at most US garden centers. Many people say new zealand sphagnum moss is the best and it is quite great stuff for some applications but the US stuff is very coarse with many twigs, roots, etc. in it which are slow to breakdown and offer excellent drainage.
    To this I wouldmix in about 10-15% oak leaf mould (crushed leaves that you can get at garden centers) this will acidify the soil without weighing it down or inviting lots of micro organisms that peat seems to. To these two I would finally mix in some horticultural charcoal to keep the soil fresh for as long as possible. If you can't find the cheaper Mosser lee US sphagnum then the NZ sphagnum mixed with about 50% fine sized orchid bark (1/4" size chips) will give you slowly degrading and fast draining substrate. If you want to add a green carpet of moss overtop the actual planting soil a top dressing of chopped NZ sphagnum will come to life much better than the US sphagnum for some weird reason.

    Above all for the soil mix I would avoid using any peat because in such a setup as this. In my straight planted terrarium trials I've only expeienced very horrific smells and eventually compacting soil when using peat or even peat substitutes such as coco fiber. It's just not free draining enough for this kind of setup in my experience and never seems to dry out.

    Before you pour your soil mix on the eggcrate put down a sheet of "weed barrier" from the garden center this will allow drainage but keep the soil from falling through the eggcrate and hopefully keep the roots from penetrating into the water below.

    Hope that gives you some ideas! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •