User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 23

Thread: N. ampullaira: is a natural setting possible?

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    68
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    So I've read nearly every thread in this forum regarding amps, and I still can't find the answer to my questions, or whether or not my idea is at all possible. I would really like to keep this plant, but to do so in a somewhat naturalistic representation of its natural habitat in something like a 10 gal or 20 gal tank. I would like to dedicate the setup to just allow the plant to take over as it pleases among the moss, leaves, etc.

    My original thought was to just create a fairly deep substrate with LFS, etc. to allow the water to stay at the bottom...but that seems to be a bad idea as it tends to rot as anaerobic areas build up. Also, it seems the best root health in amps happens when they are not constantly sitting in moisture. This being the case, do you think a false-bottom setup would be a better option, allowing water to drain out of the mix, and allow me to still siphon out old water from the bottom? Perhaps just a few inches of gravel (this would be more visually appealing)?

    I would really prefer to keep one of these in more of a viv type setting, rather than in a pot set on an upside down yogurt container. Any ideas and feedback would be greatly appreciated!

  2. #2
    Capslock's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    3,088
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think a gravel and/or charcoal bottom would be fine. My amp is pretty wet all the time, as it's on a daily timer for watering, and it's doing great. And as long as you can siphon water out, I think you should be safe, and I think N. ampularia is an excellent choice for this.

    Capslock
    Malo Periculosam Libertatem Quam Quietum Servitium

    My photos are copyright-free and public domain

  3. #3
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Far Away NY
    Posts
    4,640
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I can't really comment much on the terrarium construction/design since I don't grow plants that way.. Generally speaking there are lots more problems with trying to grow plants planted right into a terrarium. You might be better off keeping the plant potted and burying it or covering it up with something instead. I will add that a 10 or 20 gallon tank is way too small for a N. ampullaria that is anything larger than a young seedling/cutting.

    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    68
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks capslock, maybe a bottom couple inches of a gravel/charcoal mix, with a small slotted tube in the corner to allow siphoning? I'd like to stay away from the whole eggcrate layer, etc. as I just don't like the look of it. Here's the inspiration of my idea (scroll down to see trio of smaller pics): http://nepenthes.merbach.net/english/_ampullaria.html I would just love to see tons of little pots poking up through the loam, dead fern braches, etc.

    Tony, are you saying to put the pot into the substrate, giving the appearance that it's planted in the "ground?" I've got an 80 gal tank sitting empty down in the basement that I could use...

  5. #5
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Westchester County, New York
    Posts
    5,377
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would definately agree with Tony on the size issue. I have an amp that's roughly 2 years old, and it wouldn't fit in a 10 gallon....it would have trouble in a 20 gallon. I've also noticed that the size increases exponentially. 20% growth isn't much with it starts at 3" diameter....but when it's already 15" across, 20% growth is a different story.....

    Incidently (sp?), I'm having a tough time getting basal pitchers....anyone know why that might be? I really gotta get a pick of this sucker, because it's growing very strangly....sideways is the only way I can describe it.
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

  6. #6
    Capslock's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    3,088
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    schloaty,

    Mine did the same thing (grew sideways), and finally, I'm starting to get basal pitchers. Just little guys, but honest-to-goodness basal pitcher. It happens, from what I've read, when the growing tip goes below the soil line, which is about when mine started to produce them.

    Skylsdale: use the 80-gallon for sure!

    Capslock
    Malo Periculosam Libertatem Quam Quietum Servitium

    My photos are copyright-free and public domain

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    68
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The only problem I would have for the 80 gal would be lighting. They prefer shade in the wild (based on the literature I've come across) but those with experience keeping them suggest brighter light for better growth. Would two 4' shoplights (120w) be sufficient?

    Any other suggestions on how to go about this? Things to avoid? Possible pitfalls to keep in mind? The footprint of the tank is 48"x18", which I assume would be plenty of space for a while.

  8. #8
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Far Away NY
    Posts
    4,640
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The 80gal would do nicely. The issue with that size setup is not only the size but the distance from the lights. Particularly if you let it run around and it spends alot of it's time near the lower part of the tank. You might be better off with several of the screw in compact fluorescent bulbs. The light is more intense which allows them to be placed further away. There is also a fluorescent fixture that is used for outdoor lighting that has great specs. Capslock has one showing in his thread on March photos I think.. Maybe he can give you more info on it.

    Yes I was referring to burying the pot into the substrate or hiding it behind some props. If it remains in a pot you can use a different mix for the pot than for the rest of the stuff in the tank. It would also make removing the plant much easier and less stressful on the plant if the need arises.
    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •