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Thread: Small Plant, Big Pitchers

  1. #1

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    Hey, for quite some time now ive been wondering how on other peoples pictures and nepenthes how they get such big pitchers yet the main plant is small,.. for me its the complete opposite, my Bical currently is growing HUGE leaves but the recent pitcher it made is 2-3", dramatically smaller than the pitchers i had before, same thing that when i look at my ventrosica, the main plant is growing up to maybe 12" tall but the pitchers are only 3-4", and something that i cant get right with it is that it dosnt have a bunch of pitchers, just 2 now and only 2 more coming, all the other new leaves have the pitchers coming but its so slow,... one of my raffs which had been producing the biggest pitchers out of all of my neps has a recent pitcher of only 2-3" and before it was about 4-6"!they all grow in the same conditions,

    some things that come to mind is maybe im not keeping them moist enough, and im ltetting them dry out too much or that maybe i should feed my plants more often? i havnt fed them in a long while....long while, i had put milk into their pitchers about 2 months ago to see howd they go but im just seeing bigger leaves,... any ideas to help get the pitchers larger or what is going on? im completly stumped...

    thanks in advance
    Expression = Maneuverability x Coiffure squared

  2. #2
    Capslock's Avatar
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    That sounds a bit like you don't have enough light. What kind of lighting are you using?

    Capslock
    Malo Periculosam Libertatem Quam Quietum Servitium

    My photos are copyright-free and public domain

  3. #3
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    I've noticed that more light generally equals larger pitchers with shorter leaves. How much light are you plants in?
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

  4. #4

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    Natural sunlight, first 4 hours of the morning

    from around 7-11:30
    Expression = Maneuverability x Coiffure squared

  5. #5

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    light those puppies up!

  6. #6
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Light intensity is certainly one of the more important factors but it is not the only one. Out in my greenhouse I see significantly smaller and less colorful pitchers during the Winter months. I attribute the change to overall less humidity with the heaters running, some drop in light intensity (although there is less shade the sun is not as intense), and the VERY large drop in daylength hours.

    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  7. #7
    gardenofeden's Avatar
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    it depends on the species too. bacalcarata does have a large leaf to pitcher ratio.
    Stephen
    Sarracenia rosea?...don't be ridiculous!

  8. #8
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (gardenofeden @ Mar. 26 2004,10:33)]it depends on the species too. bacalcarata does have a large leaf to pitcher ratio.
    Good point... I was thinking that and forgot to mention it. Although this is more of a case where a plant is now bigger but is currently producing smaller pitchers than previously so something is obviously less to the plants liking and not a case of one species vs another.

    Something else I should mention is temperature. I see a negative effect from cooler temps on lowland plants and warmer temps on highland plants. Since the original question was about N. bicalcarata this might be a factor since it has just gone through several months of cooler Winter temperatures.

    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

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