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Thread: Clipeata hlp

  1. #9

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    Hi,

    My clipiata is doing well as a lowlander as well (in Florida). I got it a few months ago. It quickly began to grow when I got it, and each leaf is pitchering. It is really small though: about 2 in. diamiter, its one of Wistuba's clones. It is very happy now, and was one of the fastest adapting neps I've gotten.

    JA

  2. #10

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    I've been growing N. clipeata for about seven years, and in that time, I've found that it tolerates my lowland conditions quite well, for my plants are now quite large with multiple growth points. I do, however, keep the plants on the floor of my greenhouse, as it may be a bit too hot for them up on the benches overnight. Temperatues in my lowland greenhouse typically range from 20 to 35 C.

  3. #11
    HellzDungeon's Avatar
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    hmmm... my savage garden book says its a highlander...
    is there an updated version of it and if so, where can i get it?
    Nike SB is Bananas

  4. #12
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    /shrug...

    Mine has N. clipeata listed under Highland Species
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  5. #13

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    Savage Garden does? So does Slacks "Insect-Eating Plants and How to Grow Them" if you have it(and it's still pretty good info for almost 20 years old).
    I have seen neps excellent plants and he commented that for a lowlander, they were more suscepatable to burn than most, hence why they were on the floor.
    I was also thinking(help me out here Jeff), that he said N. albomarginata grows better as a highlander for him.

    Regards,

    Joe

  6. #14

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    According to Charles Clarke, this species has an altitudinal
    distribution of 600 to 800 m, which is quite well within
    what is commonly considered the lowland range. Please
    see C. Clarke, Nepenthes of Borneo, Kota Kinabalu, 1997, p. 78.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]I was also thinking(help me out here Jeff), that he said N. albomarginata grows better as a highlander for him.
    Thanks for your kind words. Actually, what I've observed is that
    the green varieties of N. albomarginata seemed, in my experience,
    to be less tolerant of high temperatures than the redder varieties.

  7. #15
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    I have found N. clipeata and N. albomarginata to tolerate my cold Winter temps but they both do a whole lot better during the warmer Spring, Summer, and Fall. I would not class either as highland..
    Deffinately lowland plants that can tolerate colder temperatures for a period of time.
    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

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