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Thread: N. thorelli

  1. #1

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    I was wondering if those with N. thorelli experience could pass on their finding and /or pitchers.

    I have a small n. thorelli that is growing quite rapidly given its small size and the fast looming Winter.

    There's not a heck of a lot on the internet that I could fins but I'd like to get a better idea of the size I can expect the plant and pitchers to reach.

    You can see my one here when I first received it:

    N. thorelli

    In the month that I have had it there is now 2x new pitchers and most of the plant and pitchers are turnig a deep pink colour. I'll get a recent picture up ASAP.

    Thanks,

    Aaron.

  2. #2

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    The flood of responces has reminded me of another factor I thought worth noting:

    This is a lowlander and from all reports I have found grows in the 0-200m range.

    However, with the onset of Winter here in Melbourne my glashouse is more highland right now. In fact I have had a few nights down to 5C (needless to say this is being quickly addressed with a new heater!) and days around the mid/hi 20's. Yet, the thorelli has not skipped a beat and seems to be thriving in it. Even more so than some of my highlands!?

    Aaron.

  3. #3

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    Hi,

    After looking at your pictures, I wonder if your plant is
    really N. thorelii. You can find a picture of what most
    people here in the US consider N. thorelii at my site
    here.

    In my experience, this species is very easy, and very tolerant
    of high temperatures, even up to 33 C, as long as it is well
    watered. I have never tried to grow it in a cool environment,
    but I would guess that it would not like it! BTW, a well-grown
    plant of this species can be stunning. It will produce multiple
    shoots, and pitchers are long-lived. At times, my largest plant
    has had over 35 healthy, functional pitchers on it, and at those
    times it has been a sight to behold!

  4. #4

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    Neps,

    Now you've thrown a spanner into the works ;-)

    Not thorelli you reckon? I had looked at the pictures on your site and figured that the lack of tendril (in my case at least) and differnt pitcher shape was due to the young age of my plant. I'll take some closer pics as soon as the new pitcher opens and post back here to see what everyone thinks.

    If not thorelli do you have a feeling for what you think it may be then?

    The picture HERE seems closer to mine than yours. Yet HERE seems closer to yours but with the shorter tendrils. I also found THIS picture doing a Google search under 'thorelli' which looks exactly like mine.

    The mystery deepens ;-)

    Aaron.

  5. #5
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Some new pics of the plant and of the pitchers would be helpful.

    Here is a picture of mine. This is a small plant a few inches across...

    N. thorelii for me does extreamly poor unless grown in strict lowland conditions.

    Tony



    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  6. #6

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    Note the wording of Jeff's comment:

    You can find a picture of what most
    people here in the US consider N. thorelii at my site


    When I was at the 2000 ICPS Conference, I got to talk to Jan Schlauer briefly, and he said, that as far as he knew, nobody had the real N. thorelii in cultivation, that it looks a lot like N. rafflesiana.
    I have only seen plants like Jeff's. Anybody seen anything like Jan would have been talking about(besides obviously N. rafflesiana)?

    Regards,

    Joe

  7. #7

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    Hi Aaron,

    some years ago I got a plant labeled N. thorelli looking very similar to your plant from Andreas. I always suspected it being labeled wrong. It is definitely a fine plant which colours up nicely under good light levels: pitchers will be deep red. It was one of my easiest plants and always grew well in intermediate to highland conditions (I didn't grew it in lowland conditions).

    Cheers Joachim

  8. #8
    noah's Avatar
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    Hi Aaron,

    Here are a few pictures of a plant which I grow as N. thorelli:





    I'm growing it indoors, so temperatures fluctuate between 50 on cooler nights and ~85 during the day on warmer days, though the usual temperature range is considerably smaller. The plants are growing a few inches from two flourescent bulbs in a humid terrarium.

    Any thoughts on whether it is true species? The conditions are definetally not highland, yet the plant is doing well.

    -noah

    P.S. yes, I know there is a spelling error on the picture... please ignore it. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img] Thanks.

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