User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Air circulation problems

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    273
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Unhappy

    I'm having air circulation problems in my mini-greenhouse. The setup is as follows:
    1" pvc pipe frame, 4'L, 3'H, 2'd, covered in clear vinyl, flourescent grow lights suspended above, room temp(averages about 72F)
    Contains mostly neps, also some drosera and cephs. The plants are sitting on plastic crates.

    I haven't found a happy medium of high humidity and good air circulation. If I leave a corner of the vinyl open, the humidity drops(or fluctuates) too much. Leaving it closed keeps the humidity up, but sooty mold appears. I bought a 6"diameter fan for the enclosure, but it causes too much "wind," and causes the humidity to flucutate wildly(which my nep. lowlanders really don't appreciate...). I suspect a smaller fan(such as those found on a cpu motherboard) might work, but have been unable to find anything smaller than 6" that runs on a/c power. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_l_32.gif[/img]
    Growlist

    We are perishing for want of wonder, not for want of wonders.
    - G.K. Chesterton

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ok, don't take this as any expert advice, because it isn't, just a thought.

    Maybe you could run an ultrasonic humidifier in a partially enclosed space and this would compensate for the open GH.

    Right now I am experimenting on my Nepenthes, trying to see what they will and will not accept. It may be that some species will actually adjust to lower humditiy (as 50%) than is suggested in literature and from experiences.

    I have found that with other CP, an adjustment period happens where traps grown in high humidity die off. This is not surprising, but when it happens growers tend to freak out and plunk the prized and usually expensive plant back in its high humidity conditions.

    But, with other genera I have found that after adjusting, the newly produced traps are MUCH stronger and able to take the lower humidity. What if the plants weren't put back into the higher humidity. Would they adjust?

    I now have several species outside protected with a translucent tarp like peaked greenhouse thingy, inside an open aquarium which has a little water at the base. I have N. ampullaria (doing well), N. truncata (doing well) N. ventricosa x maxima (thriving) N. macfarlanei (thriving, unbelieveable color!) N. ventricosa (too soon to tell). One immediate plus is I notice all the plants springing into growth, quickly growing new tendrils and pitchers. So far, there have been no real problems with the new pitchers, and as the plants color and grow stronger I am increasing the light exposure, and lessening the humidity. I go slowly, but it seems to be working. I am going to expand to include more of the species in my collection.

    These are my observations, for what its worth. I am rather new to this genus of plants, and I am probably breaking all sorts of rules, but so far my preliminary results are very positive with growing these plants 50-70% relative humidity, in protected, screened outdoor conditions. Considering this, I think that if you are brave and patient, ventillation might still work even without the humidifier. Watch the new growth, and forget about the older pitchers. If you can get good strong new growth, I believe the new pitchers will be able to take the ventillation. If the new growth seems compromised, well, back they go in higher humidity.

    Ok. Tony and Dustin, have at me! Tell me that what I am doing is a no no, and I am sure to lose my plants over time.
    I can't really advise here, but I am curious to know what is and is not possible with this genus. I *need* to be able to grow these plants outside during the good months, not having a GH sucks, but it also inspires some desperate creativity!
    "Grow More, Share More"

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    273
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]What if the plants weren't put back into the higher humidity. Would they adjust?
    I tried that for several months. My n. ampularia went into suspended animation, and my n. gracilis and albomarginata were growing at an almost imperceptible rate.
    Growlist

    We are perishing for want of wonder, not for want of wonders.
    - G.K. Chesterton

  4. #4
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Far Away NY
    Posts
    4,640
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Tamlin..
    Breaking rules? What rules? You mean there are rules to growing Nepenthes [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img] There have been very few Nepenthes that I have not been able to grow with reasonable satisifaction sitting on a windowsill. They don't always pitcher with each leaf and the pitchers may not be quite up to top shelf quality but few have outright died.

    Generally speaking.. (and I hate to make generalizations because someone will invariably say: But what about _Blah) Highland plants seem more adaptable than lowland. Ignoring the true ultrahighland and what I would call ultralowland...

    Elarwhis you can get 120v muffin fans although I would suggest just using the lowvoltage dc fans. Safer to power them via a transformer. Not sure where your located but Radio Shack carries all sorts of electric/electronic gizmos.

    I would like to ask you what kind of temperatures the plants you experimented on were receiving. You mention suspended animation and growing at an almost imperceptible rate. Sounds more like too low temperatures and not an issue of lower humidity.
    Tony



    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
    Posts
    2,974
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I am not sure what a muffin fan is, but I am pretty sure they make small fans with a clip-on attachement(made for cooling your face while at a desk) that may be appropriate.
    Other than that, Tony is right. The low should be 72 and the average maybe in the 80s for lowlanders.

    Joe

  6. #6
    fly-catchers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    383
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Tamlin Dawnstar @ June 12 2004,11:13)]Right now I am experimenting on my Nepenthes, trying to see what they will and will not accept. It may be that some species will actually adjust to lower humditiy (as 50%) than is suggested in literature and from experiences.

    I have found that with other CP, an adjustment period happens where traps grown in high humidity die off. This is not surprising, but when it happens growers tend to freak out and plunk the prized and usually expensive plant back in its high humidity conditions.

    But, with other genera I have found that after adjusting, the newly produced traps are MUCH stronger and able to take the lower humidity. What if the plants weren't put back into the higher humidity. Would they adjust?
    I agree Tamlin.
    I have a N. rafflesiana that was fast outgrowing its tank. So I risked putting it on my kitchen windowsill where its perfectly happy, and you can admire the pitchers even more [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]
    Alongside are my truncata, coccinea & gracilis!!
    All the plants went through a little adjustment "stress" before settling down and pitchering.

    So while this approach won't suit all Neps, such as bicalcurata and a few others it is surprising just how robust these plants are..

    cheers

    bill

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    273
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Tony Paroubek @ June 13 2004,1:42)]Elarwhis you can get 120v muffin fans...
    What is a muffin fan?? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/confused.gif[/img]

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Tony Paroubek @ June 13 2004,1:42)]I would like to ask you what kind of temperatures the plants you experimented on were receiving. You mention suspended animation and growing at an almost imperceptible rate. Sounds more like too low temperatures and not an issue of lower humidity.
    Yes, my lowlanders would probably be happier in a warmer environment, but I've found that they grow quite well, although at a somewhat slower rate than my other neps, if I keep the humidity high. My other neps(sanguinea, ventricosas, alata highland, etc.) did not seem to be bothered much by the humidity fluctuations, as long as they had some sort of mositure.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (The Griffin @ June 13 2004,11:44)]I am pretty sure they make small fans with a clip-on attachement(made for cooling your face while at a desk) that may be appropriate.
    I have seen those and I didn't see any that were smaller than the 6" one I already have.
    Growlist

    We are perishing for want of wonder, not for want of wonders.
    - G.K. Chesterton

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
    Posts
    2,974
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Elarwhis,

    Sounds like you have a great intermediate set-up with those ones you listed doing well. I would have to search on the web, but I have seen some with three inch fans.

    Joe

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •