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Thread: Intermediate neps

  1. #1

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    Unhappy

    I am currently compling a list of intermediate neps(or ones that can grow as intermediates) that will grow well in my room temp. grow chamber.
    The ones I am already growing are:

    N. ampullaria "speckled"
    N. khasiana
    N. alata "highland spotted"
    2- N. ventricosa
    N. gracilis
    N. sanguinea "orange"
    N. albomarginata "red speckled"

    I looked on the nepenthes univ. site and found the following that might do well(based on what I read there):

    N. argentii
    N. burkeii
    N. maxima
    N. neoguinensis
    N. pilosa
    N. rafflesiana
    N. truncata
    N. veitchii
    N. X trichocarpa

    Does anyone know of any more that would do well(incl. hybrids)?
    Growlist

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    Capslock's Avatar
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    My experience is that a LOT of neps will grow in your conditions. And hybrids often exhibit more hardiness than either parent, so there are tons of hybrids that will work. I'm growing N. ventricosa x aristolochioides in room temperatures very successfully, for example. I think the list of neps that won't work is a smaller one. Just ultrahighlanders and serious lowlanders.

    Capslock
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    My photos are copyright-free and public domain

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    yeah, I figured that alot of hybrids might work, b/c of the whole "hybrid vigor" thing. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img] Are there any general guidelines for what might work, since there are massive numbers of hybrids? Like if one parent grows @ room temp, will the hybrid grow at room temp, etc.
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    Somewhat Unstable superimposedhope's Avatar
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    I would guess that the best to stay away from is hybrids with 2 ultrahighland or 2 ultralowland parents. Perhaps though the hardiest would be a
    ultrahigh X ultralow hybrid.
    I don't know though just guessing
    \"There is nothing here of interest to any nation, as a matter of fact there is nothing here but humans!\"

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    Capslock's Avatar
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    Yeah, pretty much if one parent would work, the hybrid will work. I'm sure there are a few exceptions, but that's pretty much the way it goes, from my experience. I've just rooted a cutting of N. burkei x villosa, and that should be a good test-bed for the theory. N. villosa is a very hard to grow ultrahighlander, but N. burkei is like a ventricosa.

    Capslock
    Malo Periculosam Libertatem Quam Quietum Servitium

    My photos are copyright-free and public domain

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    IceDragon's Avatar
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    Go to Joel's website. It's good place to get an idea what you can grow.
    http://www.venturalink.net/~maxxpaxx...thesathome.htm

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    ok thanks. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img] Also I'm not sure what elevation goes with each category. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/confused.gif[/img]
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    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Anything under 1000m is considered lowland, above highland. That right there should tell you something... little in nature is very concrete to draw a line like that. Some plants have a very narrow elevation range while others have a fairly broad range. I look to this type of information to determine how well a plant tolerates different temperatures. I think Jeff Shafer at Plantswithattitude.com lists the plants normal altitude range with each description. I am not aware of a single list though that ranks each species. There really are only a few that I would consider 'ultra' lowland/highland so the designation as simply lowland or highland is usually sufficient to give an indication on the plants preferences. Barring the few exceptions, from my experience lowland plants can deal with cool nights if the days are nice and warm and highland plants can deal with warm days if the nights are nice and cool. So if you have decent warm days (82-85) and nice cool nights (58-60)you can grow a large variety of Nepenthes all together.
    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

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