User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 11

Thread: This nep flowered today -but what is it?

  1. #1
    swords's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Cernunnos Woods
    Posts
    8,121
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Not a contest, I just don't know what it is...


    I've had the plant for a couple years. I bought it from Orchids Limited as N. maxima x bongso but it doesn't look like the reference pic that I bought the plant based on (it was a pitcherless cutting back then).

    The plant has leaves about 30 cm long and pitchers up to 20 cm x 5-6 cm wide at the hip, lance shaped leaves, no hairs anywhere.

    It's not doing well in the pot I have it in (soil has become sour and I'm going to repot) but it's starting to send up a flower stalk! So I'm gonna wait til it flowers and see what sex it is first.

    Anyone have any idea what it is?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,163
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi Josh,
    I can't say for sure, but it strongly resembles a cultivar called N. 'Ted Payne'. Originally, it came from Lecoufle in France. Bruce Bednar obtained a number of cultivars from him, and this was among them. Lecoufle claims he found it in a private collection in Great Britain-Mr. Ted Payne- and that it deserved cultivar status for it's large colorful pitchers. I don't think it was ever officially described, but it has been in circulation in collections here in Florida. I have seen fourteen inch pitchers on an established, mature plant. Nobody really knows what the hybrid may be. The peristome tends towards yellow with red stripes, often flushed with a reddish cast. Many of the large Neps coming out of Brit collections with these colors have Dyeriana or Dicksoniana (raff x veitchii) in the mix, and it could very well be maxima crossed back onto one of these, but, who knows? IF it is 'Ted Payne', then it grows well under lowland and intermediate conditions-not exactly N. bongso cultivation!
    As your plant matures, it will show it's true colors and reveal if its really 'Ted Payne'. Did Orchids Limited ever trade or buy plants from Florida growers?
    Also, Ted Payne has flowered-it is male.
    Hope this is helpful.
    Trent

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Long Island, New York
    Posts
    138
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Neps have male and females?

  4. #4
    Somewhat Unstable superimposedhope's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Where the Slime Live; Where the Slime Breed
    Posts
    1,697
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yep they do. I forget the name for that, but there are distinct male plants and female plants.

    Josh, I'll guess something with truncata.

    Joe
    \"There is nothing here of interest to any nation, as a matter of fact there is nothing here but humans!\"

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,163
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think the leaf shape is too narrow for a truncata hybrid.

  6. #6
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Westchester County, New York
    Posts
    5,377
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The lid attachement is looks a little like there's some fusca in there...but maybe it's not a good angle?
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

  7. #7
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Far Away NY
    Posts
    4,640
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Pitcher and peristome shape along with the very solid wings lookie like N. mirabilis is in there to me.

    T
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  8. #8
    Steve L's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    136
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (superimposedhope @ July 01 2004,1:24)]Yep they do. I forget the name for that, but there are distinct male plants and female plants.
    The name for plants having male (staminate) and female (pistillate) flowers on different plants is dioecious. Dioecious literally means "two houses". Plants with perfect flowers (flowers with both male and female parts) or plants with male and female flowers on the same plant, are called monoecious, meaning "one house".

    Steve
    Steve L
    "I'm Lucky enough to get paid to do this!"

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •