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Thread: N. burbidgeae x edwardsiana

  1. #1

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    Hi,

    finally my N. burbidgeae x edwardsiana has setteld in and is growing and pitchering nicely. Initially I had it in a brighter spot, but it seems this hybrid likes to grow a bit darker. This is one of the first nice pitchers about 4cm in height:

    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/joachim/N_burb_edw_110704.jpg[/img]

    From the look of the pitcher I won't even be sure it is not a pure N. burbidgeae...

    I've seen some of you guyss have older plants of this clone - anyone willing to share a picture of a more mature pitcher?

    Thanks in advance.

    Joachim

  2. #2
    swords's Avatar
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    This is the only picture I have and the only pitcher my plant made. It's apparently got a messed up clay pot and it hasn't grown real well (it is 20 cm in diameter now though). But no pitchers since this one which was about 5 cm last august.


    I will be repotting it with all new media and a new net pot container in the next couple days. I will not add any perlite this time, only LFS and bark chips. I have recently read on the ICPS page on highland cultivation that perlite appeared to have a negative impact on the growth trials with N. edwardsiana seedlings. I did use perlite in this mix, I don't normally use perlite but I was trying to give excess drainage in addition to the bark and moss in several plants this being one of them.

  3. #3
    fly-catchers's Avatar
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    Hi Joachim
    Here is the first pitcher on one of my 2 plants.
    This particular plant is now growing quite well and has 3 other pitchers hopefully on their way. My other plant although bigger when I got it is far slower and only has one new leaf so far and that is now slowly unfurling. A third plant rotted & died
    [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_t_32.gif[/img]

    Although still very small and immature I can clearly see a more raised peristrome when compared to similar sized burbidgeae pitchers I have. Indeed it looks quite similar to the peristrome on my very young macrophylla, so I feel it will be a very fine plant when it matures [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

    I do hope your plant proves to be the hybrid, and I look forward to seeing further photos of it::

    Swords: Are you sure there are no "Mites" on your plant? As all my MT plants were affected by them. And even now my ovata & lowii are still showing their effects [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/mad.gif[/img] And in the UK you can't even buy any suitable chemical to deal with them, so am having to remove by hand with small paint brush and drosera muscus!!





    cheers


    bill

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    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Good lord Bill that's the first time I have heard of that method to take care of mites! Very creative I might add.

    I will try and take a picture later of some larger plants Joachim.

    Swords I have used perlite for eons on every plant and have never seen a negative impact on a single plant. The MT plants are in fact planted in half perlite half supersphag. I have some that I left potted in this mix that are doing just fine. Perhaps you got some bad perlite or there is another issue. The info that is perpetually floating around that perlite is a problem and eventually starts breaking down and releasing toxic chemicals is totally untrue if using horticultural perlite. I will take a look at the ICPS but am highly skeptical that perlite caused a problem.
    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

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    Here is the one I got from Tony. I had brought it to a NECPS meeting.



    With the warmer summer conditions it's in, it seems to have slowed down. The 2 beautiful pitchers are now each half brown.

    I was thinking about moving it outside, into a shady area. We have nice cool nights here in Connecticut. Right now it's still in a terrarium under shoplights.



    WildBill

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    I have always heard ot the flourite danger, but never heard of anyone actually experiencing it. I am sure many of us would use pumice instead, if readily available for a competative price, but I can't even get the stuff.

    Cheers,

    Joe

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    swords's Avatar
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    Hi Tony, Here's the highland growth experiment page on ICPS:
    Highland Nepenthes Cultivation Experiments

    and most particularily this part made me concerned since I was watering with less than perfect R/O water for a while before I replaced my filters:

    "Another hidden seedling killer proved to be salts that slowly leached out of perlite, one of the main media components. Perlite is hydrated obsidian that is heat treated to expand. Perlite was added to purified water (two parts water to one part perlite) and the conductivity of the water increased more than threefold, over a two day period. Since all examined groups of seedling Nepenthes seemed to favor a conductivity level in the soil of between 10-20 microsiemens; the perlite was pushing the conductive load of the media to dangerous levels (24-75 microsiemens). However, after repeated leaching the perlite became a great, inert material to use in seedling media mixes. Certainly, the quality of perlite is variable."

    And I do buy the cheap stuff from Shultz for my normal houseplants and just happened to use some on a few neps.

    But it is certain there is something awry in my container. I've avoided repotting for a long time just cos I didn't want to disturb it but it's evident I will have to. The clay pot has also become covered in algae. Something that inspired me to decide to do it was one of my N. aristolochioides pitcher tendrils landed in the pot and the pitcher that grew submereged partly in the soil of that pot was deformed. The burbidgeae x edwardsiana looks healthy it just has no pitchers - no leaf deformitoies or spots or anything.

  8. #8

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    Some recommend heavy soaking of perlite with several water changes to remove excess salts.

    Cheers,

    Joe

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