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Thread: Where to get a n. rowanae ?

  1. #9
    Flip_Side_the_Pint's Avatar
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    hey doesn't Tony have like some cuttings
    https://www.instagram.com/hull.jess/ (I post pics of my plants there)

  2. #10

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    Most new introductions tend to be from seeds, so they are often on the smaller side. I bet the the prices will go down once these are in tc, which has probably already happened. It's all a mattar of time assuming nothing goes wrong...

  3. #11
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    They are not in TC that I know of. A few seedlings were released as well as some larger plants floating around from cuttings. Propagating from cuttings is excruciating slow.

    I am working on some cuttings from the few seedlings I have. I opted to just get a few seedlings rather than invest alot on a bunch of seedlings that would have had a $$$ pricetag (Trent was pretty darn close on his estimate).
    T
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  4. #12
    Flip_Side_the_Pint's Avatar
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    cool, Tony, I think I emailed you asking about one a while ago, I think you siad it'd be expnsive (as I pondered), Do you have a waiting list?

    thanks -Jess
    https://www.instagram.com/hull.jess/ (I post pics of my plants there)

  5. #13

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    May I further add to the drool factor: there are several distinct forms of rowanae, but only the one typical form has been brought into cultivation. It appears to be an easy grower under lowland conditions.

    Trent

  6. #14
    Flip_Side_the_Pint's Avatar
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    instead of ordering from over seas... I'll just pateintly wait for one in the U.S. rather spend more for a plant locally (within the states) for a nice one then risk having such a nice plant die from shipping stress...
    https://www.instagram.com/hull.jess/ (I post pics of my plants there)

  7. #15

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    I have had a couple varieties of this plant for some time, and in my opinion it is an easy plant to cultivate under standard lowland conditions. At some point, I should have some cuttings to trade or
    sell, and I'll try to inform others when this is the case.

    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/neps/Nrowanae1.jpg[/img]

    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/neps/Nrowanae2.jpg[/img]

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    N. rowanae was rediscovered by a guy called Rod Kruger, who has just set up the Captive Exotics website. Rod grows a number of rowanae variants, as well as a huge number of Australian mirabilis variants. It is quite a sight to many huge rowanae plants in one greenhouse.

    This species is showing a few cultivational differences to Australian mirabilis. I've been experimenting with some plants Rod sent me, and I've discovered that this species can be quite temperamental.

    From Rod's experience, he notes the following traits. Firstly, it does not grow easily from cuttings. Cuttings start to shoot, then often die several months later, sometimes 75% of cuttings can fail. Secondly, they often don't flower every year, but every 2 to 3 years, which makes obtaining seed more of a challenge than usual.

    From my experiences, I note the following. Seedlings travel well, but cuttings don't unless they're very well established. Further, rowanae does not appreciate cool day temperatures. It will happily cope with cold nights provided the days get very warm, but if you have cool days, the mortality rate is high. I've found this plant touchier than bicalcarata when it comes to cold weather.

    I would recommend this species to growers who have a heated lowland set-up. If you can't provide it with constant heat, I would recommend against it to avoid heartache.

    Some of the Australian mirabilis variants are also really spectacular, but I've found them much easier to grow.

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