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Thread: Epiphytic nepenthes

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    Somewhat Unstable superimposedhope's Avatar
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    I know that the majority of the worlds epiphytes come from higher elevations in the "Mossy Forests" or "Coud Jungles". Is this true with Nepenthes as well? All the Neps that I have found described as epiphytic are highland. Are there any lowland epiphytic Neps?

    Joe
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    Hi,

    Nepenthes reinwardtiana is an epiphyte as well as veitchii. There are also highland representatives of these 2 species as well.

    Phil

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    Phil,

    Would there be a possible theory that those two originated as highland and then spread to the lowland, based on the fact that they grow in both places and most epiphytes are highland?

    Cheers,

    Joe

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    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    maybe it's because high places have a lower dewpoint, letting epps. get more moisture?

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    Somewhat Unstable superimposedhope's Avatar
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    It is because of the the cloud forest thing. The plants get bright cloud filtered light and intense humidity. I may be wrong but I don't think highlands get the downpours like lowlands do, which would deffinitley wash away some plants and seeds. I have also noticed that there are 2 classes of epiphyte.1 being the totally tree dwelling epiphyte and 2 being plants that typically start as terrestrials but have tendrils/vines/stems/etc... that can and will root in any damp crevice or pile. Upon rooting into something arboreal if it is seperated from the main plant it will continue life as a rooted cutting in its new home.


    Do epi-Neps have the ability to root from the tendrils or leaves or stems?

    Joe
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    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    only the stems. that why leaf cuttings dont work.

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