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Thread: Hybrids you would like to see!

  1. #25

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    I agree, particularly with Trent's comments. There are some amazing hybrids around, and interesting things can be done with thoughtful, planned breeding, as it does anywhere in the plant world. I was just trying to inject some reason into the debate that pointing out that most random hybridisation is not particularly appealing, and even some purposeful stuff isn't either.

    But in all thise talk of hybridisation, I fear loss of focus on the issues surrounding species. Take aristolochioides. There have been a couple of pretty hybrids made with it. Not stunning, but quite pretty, certainly nowhere near as beautiful as the original species. Aristo comes from a very limited area and is highly endangered in the wild. There are reports that several months ago, an entire stand of them was dug up by a collector. They are no longer found at that locality. The importance of propagating the species by seed becomes critical as these species disappear from the wild, as genetic variability is the key to survival as a species. Most Nepenthes come from Indonesia and Malaysia where illegal logging and land clearing is rife, and many have an uncertain future. Some species and varieties have almost certainly been lost. If you look at veitchii, is has many different forms from different localities. Some of these are now extinct in the wild. Further, varieties grown in cultivation are often not identified as being from a certain location, or vaguely identified. I've got plenty of veitchii grown from seed, but most of them are not pure wild variants, they're crosses of different forms. We could end up with plenty of veitchii in cultivation, with little of it being true to what once grew in the wild.

    Anyway, hybrids can be fun, and there challenges in growing pure species in a dioecious genus which has been mass propagated by tissue culture, but I think we need to keep these issues in mind. Sorry for being a bore [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]

    Hamish
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

  2. #26

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    Hehe [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

    I didnt intend this to be taken seriously, its just fantasy fodder [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]
    I thought it could be fun to see what other ppl's imagination comes up with :P
    Im mostly a pure-breed guy myself, but in my head Ive come up with some pretty far-out stuff...
    Most of them would indeed likely look quite dull, but the point was what they COULD look like, not what they would [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]
    Its all good fun [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

    /Quensel
    Spam, sausage, spam, spam, bacon and spam, Spam, spam, sausage, spam, egg, bacon and spam, Spam spam, spam, spam, tomato and spam...

  3. #27
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Trying not to get too off topic here since it is a thread about your dream cross.. Something very different than maintaining various populations of species.

    True alot of new hybrids may lack what one hoped for when making the cross but when a new plant never used in hybridizing flowers all your first hybrids are speculation. You can only learn from them as their dominant genetic traits become apparent, so that future crosses will hopefully yield more promising results. One must also keep in mind what is appealing and what is not. A plant considered unappealing by one person may be very appealing to another. So how do you judge then if it is a worthwhile hybrid?


    BTW.. I like toothy plants but I think it would be neat to see something way out like N. platychila x N. burbidgeae

    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  4. #28
    Capslock's Avatar
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    Tony,
    Do you know if the N. x Predator ever gets the teeth of the N. hamata?

    Capslock
    Malo Periculosam Libertatem Quam Quietum Servitium

    My photos are copyright-free and public domain

  5. #29

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    The truncata x hamata hybrid is only new and the plants around are little more than seedlings, so it's hard to say what it will look like. Hamata starts showing its teeth very early on, and the truncata x hamata plants that I've seen just have bumps on the peristome. It may be that the lower pitchers may not be that spectacular, but there's hope that the upper pitchers might have noticeable teeth due to the teeth on hamata peristomes being so exaggerated. Only time will tell.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

  6. #30

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    I would also like to add my 10 cents on this topic:

    Let's not forget that some species ie, hurrelliana may have arisen from the cross of two very well known species ie, veitchii X fusca. there is no doubt that this is a beautiful plant.

    On the other hand, there are some species which are not particularly attractive to me. ie, alata, tobaica and couple of others. The problem is that when some of us hear the word species, we are immediately biased to like "the plant even though it is not very attractive", but when we hear the word "hybrid" no matter how beautiful it may be, some of us tend to back away and not pay enough attention to the natural beauty that some of these plants may have.

    In other words, i agree that there are ugly hybrids, but i also agree that there are few ugly species.

    Gus [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_h_32.gif[/img]

  7. #31

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    I wouldn't say that hybrids are unattractive, some of them are spectacular and I grow a few myself, and make a few myself. I also grow species I don't think are terribly attractive (like the ones Gus cited) because they are species and deserve to be grown. It's all about balance.

    Hybrids are a great way of introducing people who would not otherwise grow Nepenthes, and certainly an easy way for kids to be introduced to them, which is evident by the number of young'uns on this and other fora. They have their place, but I'm just saying even "boring" species like hirsuta need conservation.

    As for hurrelliana, the debate about its origins is something I'll leave to Charles Clarke who I know has a view on that one. If you've ever seen it in the flesh, it's the hairiest Nepenthes by a mile, and is as unique as any other species.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

  8. #32

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    Hi Hamish:

    One thing about hurrelliana, hybrid or not, i want some

    [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img]

    Gus

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