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Thread: My one plant of 2004

  1. #9
    swords's Avatar
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    Sadly I didn't invent growing my neps this way. There was fellow from Israel named Ariel (I think) who used to be on here. He showed off his big terrrarium which was really packed (not an open inch to be found). He was doing something like this and I thought it was a completely great idea, especially for the epiphytes who seem to like their soil on the drier side.
    That N. inermis grew very slow for about 6 months, then I knocked the pot off the bench and saw there was almost no root system. It was in pure LFS and kept well watered. I repotted it with 50% LFS and 50% fine bark in this orchid pot and hung it and it's done fantastic ever since with the soil being able to slighty dry up and then be fully saturated in a couple days then "dry up" again... I'm still amazed it's confined to a 4" pot with no root protruding because as you know, those orchid pots are pretty shallow. Now I'm wishing for flowers so I can see what it is!

    edit:
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    Quote[/b] ]detailed description
    Haven't you learned yet, I'm a windbag! Nobody at work wants to hear about my plants so I gotta come here and unload! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]

  2. #10

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    Somebody should try this with N. campanulata. It's a ...lithophyte(sp?), which means it grows on cliffs, and your first pic of inermis kind of looks like the pics of campanulata in the wild.

    Cheers,

    Joe

  3. #11
    Somewhat Unstable superimposedhope's Avatar
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    I have had the best luck with lithophytes and transplanting. I would try it but I have no camp. All my lithos sit wedged inbetween rocks with various mediums filled in the pockets between. Anyone know what kind of cliffs? Limestone?

    Joe
    \"There is nothing here of interest to any nation, as a matter of fact there is nothing here but humans!\"

  4. #12

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    I think it is limestone, which does not equate to needing alkaline compost(the soil in the crevices for Neps is always peaty, or broken down whatever).
    Could one make a pot out of cement if they wanted to do a limestone setting, or is that completely lethal, lol(w/o years of leaching, at least)?

    Cheers,

    Joe

  5. #13
    Somewhat Unstable superimposedhope's Avatar
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    I have heard the same with northiana that it does not need limestone. The question is how well does it tolerate a lime leaching since in the wild lime would leach terribly especially in a humid/wet environment. I am not sure about either of these plants in particular but...in my experience lithophytes are pretty tolerant plant considering that they made the move with all intent to find their own niche in life. We all know how indestructible the common hen and chicks are, they are lithos. The however do not like open moist soil, they need the rock crevice thing going for the healthiest growth.
    I myself would not use limestones for crevicing though. I usually use regular old natural rock laying around. Drop the roots in and sprinkle in the soil media until full and lightly pack. Most lithos seem to enjoy sprawling across the rock or dry surfaces in general. You could do the cement planter but the thing I think would be that the roots would probably need to be running down between large chunks and likely very compacted. Plants that naturally grow with compacted roots usually flower easier than other plants and at earlier ages as well. I haven't done any of this with Neps but I have with many others so I kinda make an assumption about them.

    Joe
    \"There is nothing here of interest to any nation, as a matter of fact there is nothing here but humans!\"

  6. #14
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Thought Ch'ien took some pictures at some point of N. campanulata.. From what I recall they looked like steeply sloped heavily moss covered hills. Deffinately not rock faces with some plants sprinkled in between big boulders and cracks here and there. I am not sure I would consider them lithophytes..
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

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