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Thread: On the removal of dead stuff...

  1. #1
    StifflerMichael's Avatar
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    Several of my Neps have leaves in which the pitchers have not (and never will) develop, or where the pitcher has developed fully but is now dead. My question is: should I remove the entire leaf from the stem, or only the dying/'destined to never develop' portion. For example, for those leaves which had pitchers that are now dead (and collecting some mold), should I remove the pitcher and it's stem, or the whole leaf, or perhaps only those portions of the pitcher that are dead? Or should I just let the pitcher rot naturally?
    And how many leaves are 'safe' to remove at one time?
    To continue with this, if I do remove the whole leaf from the stem, might the dormant nodule above it begin growing (or perhaps those farther down the stem)?
    Might anybody have some suggestions? Thanks! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img]

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    Somewhat Unstable superimposedhope's Avatar
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    Remove whatever is dead. If the pitcher still has live portions in the bottom end then leave that live portion.

    Joe
    \"There is nothing here of interest to any nation, as a matter of fact there is nothing here but humans!\"

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    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    I don't cut pitchers off until they are all brown. They can still catch and digest bugs even if there is just a bit of green at the bottom. Removing the top dead portion would render them much less capable. Now that is me with my plants out in the greenhouse where wild insects are around. Inside where they are fed and not likely to catch their own food is a different situation. Also keep in mind that it is generally not a good plan to cut any living tissue. This opens up wounds that pathogens might take advantage of as well as removing plant material that is helping the plant photosynthesize.

    (hope that answered the question as I didn't read it all.. hate that green text!)

    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

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    StifflerMichael's Avatar
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    I didn't know the green was so annoying, I changed to black just for that.

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    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Probably more of an issue on how your monitor is set.. brightness contrast etc. Might look fine for some folks.
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

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    StifflerMichael's Avatar
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    No, it's pretty annoying regardless [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img] It's just me being weird I guess. Thanks for your reply!

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]For example, for those leaves which had pitchers that are now dead (and collecting some mold), should I remove the pitcher and it's stem, or the whole leaf, or perhaps only those portions of the pitcher that are dead? Or should I just let the pitcher rot naturally?
    Same as Tony here.

    If the leaf is still alive but entire pitcher and tendril dead (i.e. brown and dry) I’d remove the pitcher and tendril up to the leaf tip and leave the functioning leaf in place.

    If only the top part of the pitcher is dead I leave it. I have some pitchers that are now 6 months old. They were already on the plant when I got it and the top half died off after getting the plants. These pitchers are still going after all this time. Sure they do not look that nice but they are still providing nutrients to the plant.

    If a leaf or pitcher was in the ‘process’ of dying AND mould was forming (as in your case), personally I’d consider get rid of it.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]And how many leaves are 'safe' to remove at one time?
    Does not matter if they are completely dead (brown and dry).

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]To continue with this, if I do remove the whole leaf from the stem, might the dormant nodule above it begin growing (or perhaps those farther down the stem)?
    Not that I know of.

    Aaron.

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    Hey,
    It's also important to leave the leaves on regardless if they have a pitcher on them or not because plants need to photosynthesize. Without it they would be dead! So don't cut any of the leaves off.

    Olly
    A Chinese Proverb:
    Do not want others to know what you have done? You should not have done it in the first place.

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