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Thread: What's the most expensive?

  1. #1

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    What are the most expensive Nepenthes currently for sale? Are they all oddly colored varieties of ampullaria or species just introduced to the hobby? Will the cost of these most expensive plants drop as soon as they get going in TC?

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    At the moment, some of BE's plants are the most expensive that I'm aware of: ampullaria 'Williams Red', Ampullaria 'Tricolor' and platychila. The ampullaria variants are either cuttings or large plants, and the platychila are seed grown.

    They will eventually come down in price, but not for 12 months or more I'd say. Even then, I wouldn't expect the price drops to be dramatic, because there is little or no competition for these to bring prices down.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

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    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    It's not hard to find pricey Nepenthes from just about all the major producers. They are usually recent introductions just hitting the market or plants only produced from cuttings. A special plant only from cutting may decrease in value only marginally over a very long period (years and years). Recent introductions IF they are also put into tissue culture will most likely drop in price but again your probably looking at a fairly long time frame because of the cost, effort, and time before marketable plants are finally produced out in the grow range. There is still of course the issue of demand and availability..


    I would say though that the most expensive, you probably never see even listed on a pricelist. Special request one of a kind type deal.
    Tony



    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

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    Tony, yes I agree with you there. There are plants from species and variants out there growing in serious collectors' collections that most growers think are not in cultivation. Some of those would potentially go for serious amounts of money .... were they to be sold.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (SydneyNeps @ Sep. 30 2004,10:39)]
    Is it then safe to assume all (or at least almost all) species are in cultivation somewhere? In some cases this being only one plant?

    Was the big drop in campanulata pricing we saw over the past couple years due to it getting established in TC? Or, was there more at work behind the scene?

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    Given the rate of discoveries, there ought to be new species out there not yet in cultivation in the western botanical world. There are still many places that haven't been explored, either due to lack of accessibility, or are just so dangerous no one in their right mind would go their (like some parts of PNG and The Philippines).

    But there are at least two species I know of that are not commercially available, that are only grown by a handful collectors, that everyone thinks are still out there waiting to be rediscovered. Remember, it's not only nursery people who wander through exotic and dangerous places looking for plants.

    As for campanulata, it would be the same thing that affect prices. Availability and competition. If only one supplier has a species or variant in cultivation, then you can almost guarantee it will be expensive. As soon as there's more than one, competition can start to bring prices down. Tissue culture certainly plays a large role in this process.

    As noted elsewhere, it is not cheap to find and breed new species and cultivars, and it is sometimes very dangerous, and nurseries need to recoup costs and make money. And it's part of a market economy for prices to be a high as demand will allow. Given that there are a fair number of collectors who will pay big prices, prices will often be big until their demand is sated.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

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    Hmmmm...I guess it depends on how much people are willing to pay...
    I can think of one plant Hamish is alluding to that I would pay 5K for right now!

    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/rlhirst/devil2.jpg[/img]

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Hmmmm...I guess it depends on how much people are willing to pay...
    I can think of one plant Hamish is alluding to that I would pay 5K for right now!
    And what might that be? If you don't want to speak publicly,
    send me a private message.

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