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Thread: Possible fungus?

  1. #17

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    Aaron, Ha! Sorry, "Egad" is an ancient English expression of amazement or dismay. We sometimes use it around the office for some reason and forget that it probably dropped out of common useage centuries ago!

    Was wondering about the N. merrilliana as some of the pathogens mentioned earlier by hamish produce smaller red spots than this and pronounced raised blisters under the leaves on leathery leaved species such as N. merrilliana, N. sibuyanensis etc.

    Have to say, I've not seen fungal damage quite like that before. My first thought was chemical damage but unless you've used any chemicals on the plants recently that can't be so. Guess the Zyban will help.
    Rob Cantley
    Nep Nut in Sri Lanka
    http://www.borneoexotics.com

  2. #18
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    I still say Egad [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_h_32.gif[/img] Rob and I can retire to the old fuddy duddy farm together..

    Could be a combination of things. Looks like some pathogen on some. The sunken irregular look to some of the blotches is odd and could be caused by other factors such as cold water spotting or sunburn from water on the leaf. The water acts as a magnifying glass and you get funny burns that look odd compared to burning when a leaf is dry. But they could also be caused by a pathogen too. Which is why I asked if they continued to get larger. Burning or some sort of mechanical damage would not progress beyond what was damaged initially.

    Tony



    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  3. #19

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    Rob,

    Thanks for the English lesson [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]

    Iíll have a look at the underside of the N. merrilliana tonight.

    My very first thought was that is looked like chemical burning, but I use no chemicals what so ever in the glasshouse and I can't think of anything that could have got in inadvertently. We have been using White Oil and Pyrethrum based sprays on plants (roses and fruit trees) outside the glasshouse though this spring, but I always make sure all vents are closed first so I canít see how this could be a source.

    Not much I can do I suspect until I get hold of this fungicide and see how that goes.

    I know the brand names vary internationally, but I have also been recommended a cheaper alternative to Zyban called Fongarid. Anyone know of this?

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ] Garden King Fongarid Systemic Fungicide

    Fongarid controls damping off, and root rots caused by soil-borne fungal diseases. It is only registered for ornamental plants, and so should not be used on fruit and vegetable crops. Fongarid can give approximately 6 to 10 weeks protection from soil-borne disease attack, depending on rate applied, soil type and cultural practice.

    Pack Size: 10g ( 5 x 2g sachets)

    Active Constituent: 250g/kg Furalaxyl

    How To Apply: Mix 2g of powder with 2 litres of water, and apply to soil or potting mix at the rate recommended on the label. It is important to water in thoroughly. Consult the pack for full details.
    Thanks for everyone's input thus far.

    Aaron.

  4. #20
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Furalaxyl is in the same class of fungicides as Subdue 2e (metalaxyl). These fungicides are specific for damp off and pythium and phytophthora root rots. Unless the person recommending it has personal experience with it controlling leaf spot and other leaf/stem pathogens, particularly the ones Hamish listed, I would not recommend it.

    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  5. #21

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    Thanks Tony. The fact that it made only reference to "soil" applications had me wondering.

    Hamish has very kindly offered to help me out with some Zyban.

    Aaron.

  6. #22

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    Aaron,

    OK, then no chemicals, so suppose it has to be a fungus. Tony is right of course about chemical burns not spreading. Would take a lot of chemical to do that, not just spray drift from outside.

    Thiophanate methyl has worked very well here for all types of leaf spot. Stops it dead in it's tracks if applied correctly. Deformation of the next pitcher is possible with some species, tiny lids etc.

    Good luck!
    Rob Cantley
    Nep Nut in Sri Lanka
    http://www.borneoexotics.com

  7. #23

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    Now Rob...

    You should know that you cannot make a statement like...

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Stops it dead in it's tracks if applied correctly.
    ...without elaborating further! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]

    From the load of web searching I did today this may be along the lines you are suggesting:

    - Needs to be applied to all surfaces of the effected plant.
    - Apply about 2x per year. More often may increase the chance of the fungus becoming immune. Less often may enable the fungus to get a foothold and cause more damage.
    - Avoid getting it on live LFS if at all possible

    There were also a few suggestions of trialling the fungicide on expendable plants first. But this does not make much sense, as if the fungus is not treated, the plant is likely to either succumb or be weakened and look terrible anyway!?

    Hamish mentioned to me that the Zyban may cause some deformities initially, but I'd happily tolerate that if it means getting rid of this supposed fungus.

    Aaron.

  8. #24

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    Ooh! Ah! Now we're in dangerous territory - what works for us may not be good for you. The leaf spot I have seen in the past was caused primarily by a Cercospora sp. and the effects of the pathogen were rather different to that shown in your photos, smaller spots and raised blisters underneath the leaves of some species. Other species had no symptoms at all but were probably infected also.

    We used a locally available thophanate methyl called "Topsin" which contains no other fungicide; I don't know what Zyban is without researching it. Suggest you first read the directions for ornamentals on the label when you get it but here's what worked for us:

    Drenching (really soaking but avoiding getting too much in pitchers) with a watering can 3 times at 10-14 days intervals on afflicted plants (in our case we did all the nurseries after trials to be on the safe side). Thereafter a monthly spray as a preventative. Now this is in a nursery where we are surrounded by farming territory which is a potential source for disease and there are many plants in the nurseries. I don't think such a regular preventative spray will be necessary for a small collection, although I would recommend treating any new plants you are adding to the collection since some of these fungi are very common in cultivated Nepenthes and quite infectious.

    This info comes with a warning - you may see damage in developing pitchers - or worse. It's not possible to be sure and trials take a long time to show results. Our plants rewarded us with a huge growth spurt on the next leaf, even on plants that had no overt symptoms but we water heavily from above every morning so the chemical didn't hang around on the leaf surfaces for more than a night.

    Hamish has warned of the risk of resistant strains of fungi appearing if this chemical is used too often but you can probably worry about that later. Looks to me like first aid is the order of the day.

    Hope this helps. If it ends in tears, I never made this posting! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]
    Rob Cantley
    Nep Nut in Sri Lanka
    http://www.borneoexotics.com

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