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Thread: Possible fungus?

  1. #41

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    Daconyl certainly acted as a mutagen for us [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]

    Would be interested in your Mancozeb concentrations Gus, and how you apply, a foliar spray? Do you wash it off afterwards and if so after how long. Thanks! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]
    Rob Cantley
    Nep Nut in Sri Lanka
    http://www.borneoexotics.com

  2. #42
    MadAboutCPs's Avatar
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    In regards to Mancozeb. I use a concentration of 3g (one spoonful) per 1 litre. Thanks for the Help Gus! In addition I have found no long term phytotoxicity in using this fungicide providing you stick to the instructions. I think a dosage of 10X as in systemic use would possibly cause this as it may make the plant weaker. As Gus mentioned, if the symptoms are very bad and it doesn't work then use Zyban. As for the Mancozeb I do rinse it off after a 24hr period but have been advised from Gus just to leave it on as it really won't affect the plant apart from the presence of a white dust. I apply it on the tops and undersides of the leaves only and avoid too much contact with the soil.
    The mancozeb attacks the SH group proteins of the fungus and is effective on impact with the infected area.
    There are many different active ingredients for fungicides as they each do a particular job (wether they inhibit reproduction, etc..). Mancozeb has the Dithiocarbamate as the active ingredient whereas it is different for Zyban. Mancozeb decomposes naturally in acidic or alkaline soils.
    Fongarid won't work on problems such as Cercospora spp. It is designed to deal with root fungus such as damp off, phytophora spp.

  3. #43

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    Hi everyone:

    I would like to let you all know the concentrations i use of mancozeb. Actually i use Mancozeb plus which is a combination of wettable sulphur at 560g/Kg and 240g/Kg of Mancozeb. I am using 5 g per litre of water.

    I use it as a foliar spray, but i spray it thoroughly, making sure the are no spots without the mancozeb.

    I don't bother rinsing it off and i have not found any cytotoxic effects on Nepenthes and Cephalotus.

    Rob: you certainly have amongst the largest collections of rare Nepenthes in the world, so I can't say use it on all your plants, but as far as i know my green babies are happy and are very tolerant to Mancozeb plus. I mostly have highlanders growing.

    Gus

  4. #44

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    Thanks very much for the information guys. So far our trials have shown no ill effects so we'll start using it on the nurseries in rotation soon. We use thiophanate ethyl regularly and want to rotate with Mancozeb and others.

    One final question - do you use any wetting agent to assist in spreading the powder?
    Rob Cantley
    Nep Nut in Sri Lanka
    http://www.borneoexotics.com

  5. #45

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    Rob:

    The powder portion of mancozeb is not as soluble in water as the rest of it, but i just mix all of it with water and spray it all over.

    Gus

  6. #46
    MadAboutCPs's Avatar
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    Hi gus,

    That is true. But I always give it a good shake. Hehe.

    I read a while ago that Bicarbonate of soda is a natural fungicide. Has anyone other than myself tried this? I have attempted it with a N.ventricosa on the leaves that were exhibiting rust spots. They ceased to grow and the plant did not experience any drawbacks. Let me know on your attempts and explain to me why it has these effects and why one would want to use a fungicide that would cause a fungus to become resistant. They certainly can't become resistant to bicarb, can they?

    C

  7. #47

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    Chris:

    I am not sure whether sodium bicarbonate is a good fungicide but it certainly is a good buffer, so the pH of your soil may change to Neutral or basic . Watch out.

    Gus [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/confused.gif[/img]

  8. #48
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    I would also be concerned with the sodium. Sodium is very toxic to most plants.
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

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