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Thread: Soil question

  1. #1

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    Unhappy

    Hello,
    I bought my nepenthes, pitcherless, in February this year. It's still pitcher to this very moment. But, I've successfully propagated two stem cuttings. I have used mulch instead of orchid bark, peat and perlite for their soil. Last week I've noticed that their leaves, pitcherless too, were yellowish but not like they were starting to wither. They are in my house with the temperature around 20 C and I mist them 3-4 times a day.
    Could mulch be the cause for the color change?
    And how do I make them pitcher? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_h_32.gif[/img]

  2. #2

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    Mulch would not be a good idea, because it is rich in nutrients, exactly the opposite of what Nepenthes need. They are carnivorous because the soils in which they grow are leached and low in nutrient. I wqould hazard a guess that your plants are not producing pitchers because they don't need to - they're getting enough nutrient from the soil.

    Good components for Nepenthes media are sphagnum moss, orchid bark, perlite (good idea to soak this one for a few days and rinse before using) and coconut coir. The mix needs to suit your growing conditions - the higher the humidity and wetter the conditions, then a more free draining medium can be made. If humidity is a bit lower, and conditions dryer, then more sphagnum should be used.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

  3. #3

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    Mulch=Evil
    Mulch carries too many nutrients, it will poison the plant.
    I mainly use 1/2 Sphagnum and 1/2 osmunda(fern) fiber. (you can get the fiber from www.********************.com) And my nepenthes love it.
    You have just recieved the Amish Computer Virus. Since the Amish don't have computers, it is based on the honor system. So please delete all the files from your computer. Thank you for your cooperation.

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    Ok,
    I will repot them ASAP. But what about the mother plant? It's still in its original pot with original soil but doesn't pitcher anyway. However it's producing new leaves very fast and it's very green.

  5. #5
    MadAboutCPs's Avatar
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    If you are attempting cuttings, You should try rockwool. Rockwool is a sterile subtrate, nutrient defficient and has a considerable striking rate. In addition, once the cutting has rooted, you can then place it all in the preferred mix as Hamish mentioned.

    C

  6. #6

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    Well, those two cuttings have their roots developed but not mother plant has pitchers nor cuttings themselves. I haven't repotted cuttings yet but will tomorrow.
    Still my question is how do I make them pitcher? Will I have to wait spring for them to pitcher?

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    MadAboutCPs's Avatar
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    Change your soil medium to what hamish mentioned. Mulch is a no no because it contains nutrients that retard the growth of pitchers.

    What species or hybrid of nepenthes is it? Is it a highland, intermediate or lowland? If it is not pitchering it usually in most cases means there is not enough humidity. You may be spraying it 3-4 times a day, but this does not mean that the humidity will stay constant throughout the day. There will be fluctutations in the time that you are not there to care for your plant. Most neps don't like a multitude of fluctuations in temperature and humidity. They can also take time to adapt to your conditions. Try putting a bag over it or better yet stick it in a tank to keep the humidity high. If you want to grow it outside of an enclosure use a reasonable layer of sphagnum to cover the top of the soil surface.

    C

  8. #8

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    Thanks for the advice.
    I don't know it's species because seller wasn't in the CP's and wasn't interested (only wanted money). Got it for 1.5$.
    This is my first nepenthes.
    Tell me one more thing. Winter is coming fast. What about dormancy period, temps, watering, foto period. Roughly since I don't know if it's lowland, intermediate or highland.

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