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Thread: Coloring

  1. #17
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Although there is nothing stopping you from registering a plant that someone else created, general consensus is to give that person the opportunity first.
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  2. #18

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    It is recommended to get permission from the originator of the plant, and in fact, the origin of the plant is part of the registration process. Interestingly, you do not have to know the parentage, but if it is known, it should be part of the description process. The description should be as detailed as possible to point out the plant's uniqueness.

    Trent

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    Although I'm not an expert on light spectrums or wavelengths I do know for a fact that flourescent lighting has a tendency to produce specialized colors that sometimes are un-achievable in natural lighting. For example...I recently obtained several plants of Ping. Pirouette that were the deepest, darkest pink I have ever seen on a plant. These were grown entirely under artificial lighting when I received them. These were placed in my very bright greenhouse and within 2 or 3 weeks they all lost the beautiful pink and turned completely green. I then put one under my light setup and within a few days it began turning bright pink again. I've grown hundreds of Nepenthes under my light setup which consists of 125W high output compact flourescent bulbs and they have always developed better colors than they do in the greenhouse.

    I don't know what it is in the flourescent bulbs that brings out these colors or even triggers the plant to produce them but they always lose these especially vibrant colors when they are moved to or are grown exclusively in the greenhouse. Of course I have specific plants that retain their colors when grown in both conditions.These are mainly lowlanders and I don't know the reason for this. It is an observation I have made with many of my collegues who have similar growing arrangements. Their plants always have deeper colors under the grow lights and then either lose them completely or lessen them when moved to the greenhouse and are grown under duplicate foot candle exposure.

    It would be interesting to see what your results would be if you moved these plants into natural lighting. If you retain the same characteristics then I would say you probably have a unique color form of spathulata x veitchii.

    Has anyone else performed similar growing experiments or observed similar results when comparing artificial light grown vs. natural light grown?

    Phil

  4. #20

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    wonder why my post keeps getting cut out. something i said tony?
    They say if you play a Microsoft CD backwards, you hear satanic messages. Thats nothing, cause if you play it forwards, it installs Windows.

  5. #21
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    What post?
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

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