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Thread: New images

  1. #17
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Go ahead Rob! Lets see how many the word filter catch LOL.

    I really don't think the current state of Nepenthes taxonomy is that bad. Just imagine how it was when natural hybrids were considered species. Or even worse when the same plant was listed as 2 species because of dimorphic lower and upper pitchers.

    My copper bits on photo file sizes. I have a reasonably good dialup. It took about 7 minutes to open the pictures. Theoretically they could be about 1/4 the file size without impacting the viewable quality over the internet. It would reduce down load time for folks stuck in the sticks. 1/4 of a few seconds doesn't seem like much but 1/4 of 7-8min is very noticeable. I also had to reload a couple times because only a few would download and the rest would come up with red x squares as they timed out taking too long to download them all in one try.

    Perhaps it is nitpicking a bit. At least they aren't 1meg+ each LOL. Besides I would rather you keep posting pics.. I can just go get a snack while waiting
    [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/cool.gif[/img]

    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  2. #18

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    Red face

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Tony Paroubek @ Nov. 15 2004,7:20)]Besides I would rather you keep posting pics..
    Ah c'mon I wasn't criticizing, I was just giving him some advice.
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/phyrex/phyrex.gif[/img]

  3. #19

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    My mistake on your campanulata. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img] Thats really cool! Thanks Rob. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

  4. #20

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    Hi Jeff,

    very nice pics!!

    We discussed the N. faizaliana clones already some time ago. Ch'ien's comments are at the third page.

    http://www.**********.com/cgi-bin....5;st=20

    Cheers Joachim

  5. #21

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    Very nice pix, Jeff. The Nepenthes macrophylla is a beauty - I'm fervently hoping that mine will look like this in a coupla years...

    I also have N. faizaliana from MT and it is nearly identical to the image of the plant that Tony posted (it is rather darker overall, almost certainly from outdoor culture). One of the things that I've noticed about this particular plant is that the pitchers are formed very, very slowly, but that they last forever. I have one 20 cm tall lower that is just starting to brown after a year. Much more than N. fusca, this sp. reminds me of some highly-colored N. stenophylla clones. Lovely, thick, shiny leaves, too.

    My two cents on the issue of Nepenthes taxonomy: one of the very real problems with unusual "ornamental" plants of all kinds is that new descriptions are driven more by the desire of the horticultural trade to offer a bigger selection (more species = more potential sales), or the desire by amateur botanists to publish, than by the interests of comparative botany. In spite of this bias, most of the new carnivorous taxa being described these days appear to be "good". An additional aggravation is that collectors naturally gravitate to/take the "showier" examples in a given colony to serve as the type series, which may not necessarily best represent the whole of the population. As a further complication, species that are thinly-distributed in very remote regions often yield very few type specimens (sometimes, only the holotype!) to "first contact", and these individuals also may not represent the species in its totality. And finally, when dealing with the genus Nepenthes specifically, you have the added complications of intraspecific variability deriving from environmental factors (exposure, elevation, etc.), dramatic ontogenetic changes as the plant progresses from rosetted seedling to hemiepiphytic or epiphytic vine, and the genetic "pollution" from pollen imported into the deme from species that occur in sympatry.

    I suspect that, as our knowledge grows and our understanding of the family improves, we may find that several "good" species that we grow today may either be sunk, or be found to represent particular, fairly stable forms within hybrid swarms.

    As an aside, what I find to be an amazing coincidence is that the coveted "post-modern toilet bowl" Nepenthes types (jacquelinae, platychila, and Andreas Wistuba's newest sp. nov.) are all being described in what should presumably be the final chapter of discoveries of novelties in this genus (1995-2005). Since two are Sumatran and one Bornean, one wonders what else is out there in the wilds of Malesia. YIKES!!

    Peace,

    SJ

  6. #22

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    Hi Stone jaguar:

    Yes, you are right about the showy specimens being used as the standard form of the species. However, nowadays, Nep growers are more realistic about what to expect when he/she acquires a new plant.

    One quick note on the beautiful toilet bowls, these are not the last ones to be found on the last chapter of discoveries between 1995-2005, don't forget the Hairy Hamata!. That's definitely a beautiful plant and another great discovery by Chi'en Lee.

    One thing i learned about these plants is that specific physical traits are not unique within a species but passed on on to another one if the environmental pressure is great enough to allow the survival of the new species.

    Gus

    Gus

  7. #23

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    Couldn't agree more with your comments on taxonomy Stone Jag but the final chapter in discoveries won't be over until the last tree is felled.
    Rob Cantley
    Nep Nut in Sri Lanka
    http://www.borneoexotics.com

  8. #24

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    And Malaysian logging companies are doing their best to make sure that day comes as quickly as possible...
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

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