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Thread: Hamata and lowii

  1. #17

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    I also understood that an ultrahighlander had to have a minimum above 2000 m, but there are always exceptions. I was thinking aristolochiodes likes it colder than you would think for it's altitude, but I don't have my Clarke handy.
    Also, is it N. reinwardtiana that grows from 0 all the way up to 2100? Best described as an intermediate, with that range, right? I don't think anyone would call it a ultrahighlander since it can be found above 2000 m. Hope I have the right one in mind there.
    All in all, the advice on these forums is top notch, I would say.

    Cheers,

    Joe

  2. #18

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    Schloaty, you're right. The information about hamata needing higher humidity than other neps is basically a myth. The only time hamata is more sensitive is just out of tissue culture, when the leaves are extremely thin, more so than other species (maybe tentac gives it a run for its money). A hamata not long out of tissue culture would possible die if it was left in very low humidity for more than 2-3 days (which I've tried). Once acclimatised, hamata is the same as any other highland nep. I have a heap growing outside of varying sizes, even one barely 5cm across that has gone through days of 36C and 9% humidity without blinking. Then again, there are plenty of myths about nepenthes than have arisen over the decades and even centuries which I see occasionally peddled around (i.e. khasiana being the most cold tolerant etc).

    Joe, I'm very sceptical about species altitudinal descriptions that are really broad. The reinwardtiana one wouldn't surprise me if it was actually N. murudensis being referred to at the upper levels. There are a couple of other species altitudinal ranges than are in print that are based on one alleged sighting that nobody else was ever able to confirm, even after searching. Again, information gathered over centuries that has never really been winnowed down.

    Hamish
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

  3. #19
    MadAboutCPs's Avatar
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    The classification of nepenthes, i.e. true lowland, lowland, intermediate, highland and ultra highland are only guidelines to follow. Most will favour either a lowland or highland setup and a majority of nepenthes are quite tolerant than what they have been given credit for.

    Many people grow them differently. From an individuals' perspective, each would provide the appropriate conditions for their plants. Their countrys' weather being an important factor, i.e. wether they grow them on a windowsill because there is sufficient humidity or else a terrarium to provide the humidity.
    One may be able to grow a hamata outside, but is it really healthy for the plant in the long run (i.e a hinderance to its' growth or eventually death), of which its natural habitat is already spoken for? Certainly when a plant is larger, it can slowly be introduced into a environment that it is not usually accustomed to. Surely there will be multiple deaths before one is found to survive and struggle with the conditions.

    Question: As an example, if two nepenthes (i.e. a hamata male and a hamata female) were successfully introduced to an environment that had a humidity of 40%, temperature of 25 degrees celsius during the day and high humidity, 5 degree celsius temperature at night, resulting in a seed set. If these were sowed in the same environment, will they germinate or will they require a more suitable environment from where they originated?


    Christian

  4. #20
    I've got a magic window! elgecko's Avatar
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    Thought I would add my experience with hamata.
    I agree with schloaty and SydneyNeps. I find hamata adaptable.
    I grow my plant as a windowsill plant. It is located at my south facing sliding glass door. The plants during this time of year recieve direct sunlight most of the day.
    During the day, now that winter has come, with the forced hot air, humidity somedays has dropped to 25%. At night humidity is usually around 45%. I do have a humidifier on the furnace, but has only been running at night right now.
    When I first got the plant all but 2 pitchers dried up with in the first few weeks. Now it has adjusted to the new growing conditions and plant has been producing pitchers non stop without problems.
    I'm very pleased.


    My Grow List Updated 8/24/17

  5. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]hamata needing higher humidity than other neps is basically a myth. The only time hamata is more sensitive is just out of tissue culture, when the leaves are extremely thin
    I think you are right, ******** says that they are harder to keep (because of humidity) until they get to 6 or so inches in diameter, then they are more tolerant, but you said that they are more tolerant than even that didn't you?
    You have just recieved the Amish Computer Virus. Since the Amish don't have computers, it is based on the honor system. So please delete all the files from your computer. Thank you for your cooperation.

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