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Thread: Nep tank

  1. #1

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    For some reason the humidity in my nep tank is always higher in the day 90-95% then it is during the night 85-90%. I thought that it should increase at night when the lights are off and the temperatures are a little lower. Any ideas on why it is higher during the day? And also does this reverse humidity flux have a negative effect on the plants? Thanks Craig
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    Probably because it is an artificial environment, with condensation on the glass due to the temperature differential between the inside and outside. If it is properly sealed, as it gets warmer during the day, the air would completely saturate. When it cools, the glass cools much more than the air inside so the moisture condenses on the glass. This may have an effect on humidity readings. Just a guess...
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

  3. #3

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    Ok, would this have an effect on the plants?
    You don't need an iron chest if you have a sharp brain and a silk tongue.


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    Not really. The main thing you find with terrarium plants where the humidity is very high, is that they get very "soft". All it takes is a drop in humidity and the wilt like there's no tomorrow. Of the five or so main elements that influence Nepenthes health and growth, humidity is not at the top of the list. Sunlight and temperature, in my experience, are more important.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

  5. #5
    MadAboutCPs's Avatar
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    If you choose to grow your neps in a terrarium. The best way to combat this would be to increase the gap at the top for air flow. Any excess water will be lossed in the atmosphere. This will also help your plants harden off as to avoid the leaves from becoming 'soft'. Using a hygrometer check the readings throughout the day at 1hr or 2hr intervals so that you can get an idea of wether it meets the species requirements. Most people think that once they have it at the right humidity at the time that it will remain at that percentage. This is not always the case. There will be temperature fluctuations or spikes. For the highlands its best to keep them between 75% - 85% humidity during the day and 100% humidity at night.

    For temperature control buy 1 heat mat for a 2ft tank or 2 for a 4ft tank and place them evenly apart. Most heat mats will keep a great ambient temperature range of 25-30 degrees celcius during the day. Add a timer to switch the heat mat off before night falls and if it is a warm night, just add a few blocks of ice to each plant.
    Also, bricks,pebbles and gravel are great insulators of heat. Place an even 2-3cm layer of gravel at the bottom of the tank and water (make sure the water level does not exceed the height of the gravel). Place each plant in plastic saucers (or plastic plates that you get from the grocery stores). The heat mat will heat this water to provide humidity. On a cold day during the colder months, the pebbles will keep the heat in. Nepenthes will slow down in growth in the colder months but if you can provide the heat then they will keep on growing. If you do it this way, there is no need for a mister.

    Be aware that if you are using a metal halide for providing light, that this will increase the temperature in the tank by a few degrees. At least 2-4 fluorescent tubes that emit red and blue colors of the spectrum is sufficient as these won't produce as much heat as the halides.

    If you are growing lowlands in a seperate tank, you won't need a timer for the heat mats. Just leave them on.

    :

    C:

  6. #6

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    The higher humidity you have, the higher the lumens have to be, in my experience. This ensures not only that they get hardened off, they also grow really well and have great colouration. I use 3 to 4 compact fluorescents/200" squared to do the job magnificently. I don't trust tubes anymore, even for growing Drosera and Pinguicula.
    As for your concern over humidity, I think your conditions are well above satisfactory to the plants. Winter in Michigan is the time to grow those highlanders (from my experience)!!

    Good growing!

    Amori

  7. #7
    MadAboutCPs's Avatar
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    Amori,

    Compact fluorescents are the way to go. I use three of them on my marine tank for corals. And a few for plants. One positive aspect is that the output of lumens will not decline over time and will emit a constant output until the fluoro is at the end of its tether.

    C

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