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Thread: Bad news : nepenthes viking extinction ?

  1. #17
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    I completely agree with what Hamish said. Sure, a natural diaster of this kind of magnitude is awful on the environment and people, but if the plants are growing in this spot that has been hit more than once with this kind of phenomenon then something must be preventing them from dying off.

  2. #18

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    Legendary naturalist Alfred Russell Wallace spent many years exploring the more remote parts of Malesia during the middle of the nineteenth century, and his classic "The Malay Archipelago", is peppered with observations about dead or dying coastal forests due to salt water intrusion from abnormal tidal surge. The book is also filled with passages that detail his own experience with earthquakes, volcanic eruption and tidal waves while travelling through the region. The impact on the landscape is no real surprise to those of us who live in seismically active regions. Following the quake on the Caribbean coast of in Costa Rica in April 1991, several observers noted that live coral reefs had been thrust upwards several feet to roast in the sun, while Bactris palm stands had subsided deep into salt water lagoons.

    While many of us shrink at the thought of a showy Nep population challenged by a tidal wave, I suspect that earlier comments that speculate that these plants have surmounted this type of event before are probably quite correct. I presume that we will have an answer on their survival, one way or another, within the next several months.

    Clearly, the loss of endemic organisms due to natural causes is no less a tragedy than extinctions prompted by human myopia or evil.

    The catastrophe as a whole defies my best efforts at comprehending it.

    Prayers for the living,

    Jay

  3. #19

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    This evening I heard a lot of news with deep regret.More than 20,000 fishing families have been severely affected by the tsunami which ravaged six southern coastal provinces on Sunday. One of those families is one whom I was so worried about because their humble cottage was 15 meters from the beach.Bung Kasem , his wife and two children were whom I tried to make contact by phone since the disaster. The line returned no signal everytime .I just knew why this afternoon.Half of the village was swept out to sea . Their cottage with bodies were found under 5 feet deep sand and mud . Bung Kasem was the one who took picture of Viking in the wild for me . He helpt me collect data of Vikings in their natural habitat .
    Late evening , a call from Phang_Nga province again. Nearly all area of plainland on the Island where Vikings grew are covered with sea mud.
    Till now , the death toll rose sharply yesterday to 1,657 with 8,954 injured and 4,086 still missing and there are still many dead bodies waiting to be removed. The Navy officer believes there are no more survivors left on the islands in Andaman sea. Many coastal villages and resorts now nothing more than mud-covered and rubble blanketed with the stench of rotting bodies.
    Sorry.
    Let me share with the idea that if the plants are growing in this spot, they might have been hit more than once with this kind of phenomenon. The statistic from Thailand's Mineral Resources Department shows the earthquake that sent tidal waves crashing into southern Thailand on Sunday was the worst one to affect the country in 459 years. And to review the history of our country , no phenomenon of any Tsunami like disasters had ever been recorded 600 years back. No legend , folktales or any literatures of Tsunami-like disaster while there are few about earthshakes and a lot of monsoons . Or I can say , this is the first Tsunami ever recorded in Thai history.
    Just an input for discussion.Anyway , I still believe the plants will survive and recover with the help of mother nature.It may take a month to explore the real situation and I have a lot to do meanwhile .I will join the forum again . Thanks for all.
    Nong

  4. #20

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    Adaptability is my concern regarding Vikings. We have genuses like periplaneta americana = common american roach which has survived earthquakes, tsunamis for thousands of years. On the other hand we have the Dodo which was extincted hundreds of years ago.
    If both were adapted to their own environments why the former is still around and why the latter disappeared?

  5. #21
    BobZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (nepizumiae @ Dec. 29 2004,12:11)]Adaptability is my concern regarding Vikings. We have genuses like periplaneta americana = common american roach which has survived earthquakes, tsunamis for thousands of years. On the other hand we have the Dodo which was extincted hundreds of years ago.
    If both were adapted to their own environments why the former is still around and why the latter disappeared?
    Humans and their associated cargo caused the extinction of the dodo. It has been postulated that the best way to get rid of pests and exotic invaders is to make them tasty or otherwise marketable.

    There is a good discussion about the dodo at
    http://www.bagheera.com/inthewild/ext_dodobird.htm

    Here is an excerpt:
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]In 1505, the Portuguese became the first humans to set foot on Mauritius. The island quickly became a stopover for ships engaged in the spice trade. Weighing up to 50 pounds, the dodo was a welcome source of fresh meat for the sailors. Large numbers of dodos were killed for food.

    Later, when the Dutch used the island as a penal colony, pigs and monkeys were brought to the island along with the convicts. Many of the ships that came to Mauritius also had uninvited rats aboard, some of which escaped onto the island. Before humans and other mammals arrived the dodo had little to fear from predators. The rats, pigs and monkeys made short work of vulnerable dodo eggs in the ground nests.

    The combination of human exploitation and introduced species significantly reduced dodo populations. Within 100 years of the arrival of humans on Mauritius, the once abundant dodo was a rare bird. The last one was killed in 1681.

  6. #22

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    Wow,that is such a devastateing event! My heart goes out to you you`re family and your people.

    Plants come back people don`t. I sure hope that nothing else like this happens for quite a while(never would be good).


    So sorry to hear about the destruction [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_h_32.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_h_32.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_h_32.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_h_32.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_h_32.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_h_32.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_h_32.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_h_32.gif[/img]
    I`m just thankful you`re ok. During all the hurricanes in florida my friend Kelsey in pensacola I was so worried about because she didn`t contact me for like 6 months but thankfully her family got out without an deaths although an uncles of hers house was crashed in by a tree.

    Please keep us updated on this.
    You are in my prayers,
    Noah.
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/pondboy/Neps/Neps%20sig..JPG[/img]

  7. #23

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    Interesting info Bob. If we were to compare to the number of insecticides people have used on the common roaches, these should be extinct by now.
    Thus, the adaptability of the Roaches is far greater than that of the Dodo. I would have to agree though that man played an important role in its extinction.

  8. #24

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    If someone has a male and female plant in cultivation, there is still hope for the species. I really hope someone does. If there is, it can be reintroduced in to the wild in areas that are suitable for it.
    You have just recieved the Amish Computer Virus. Since the Amish don't have computers, it is based on the honor system. So please delete all the files from your computer. Thank you for your cooperation.

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