User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 9 to 14 of 14

Thread: N. papuana?

  1. #9

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,163
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    After looking at BobZ's links to photos of N. papuana, we are even more confused! He has three links. None look like Danser's illustration (nor the same species in the 3 different photos).

  2. #10
    swords's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Cernunnos Woods
    Posts
    8,120
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just a few more weird bits from Jebb & cheek:
    N. mirabilis up to 200M and rarely 1000m but up to 1500m in New Guinea

    N. papuana: 250 m - 900 m
    "might be confused with N. neoguineensis which it is possibly closely related, differing from N. neogineensis' paniculate inflorescence and upper pitcher wings that are broadest at the base."

  3. #11

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,163
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks, Josh. That is interesting. Also, ampullaria is found over 1000 meters in altitude in New Guinea. Maybe there's a highland form and lowland form of papuana, or it has a higher altitudinal range on the high end of the range than originally thought.

  4. #12
    swords's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Cernunnos Woods
    Posts
    8,120
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I wonder if the "highland" forms of these new guinea species will actually grow well as intermediate/highlanders? If not then I wonder if location of the island has some sort of bearing on lowland plants appearing above 1000m in New Guinea only?
    Are the hills of New Guinea warmer at higher altitudes than other montane climates of similar Nep inhabited islands? Perhaps 1000m in New Guinea is much warmer than Borneo or Sumatra? If I recall doesn't New Guinea have the equator running straight through it whereas Borneo & Sumatra are just a few degrees north?
    Perhaps this would explain it? If my geographys wrong, my excuse is I can't find my atlas...

  5. #13

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    703
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The New Guinea Highlands are no more warmer or cooler than highland elsewhere in the tropics as far as I know. Personally, I am sceptical about reports that ampullaria is found above 1,000 metres in New Guinea, I'd be glad to hear of any reliable first hand accounts of anyone who has seen it at that altitude.

    There needs to be a heap of work done on New Guinea Nepenthes. Like Nepenthes scholarship general in the past, so much of it is poor. Even Danser made some clangers. The problem with New Guinea is that both Irian Jaya and Papua New Guinea are not safe places to travel. Irian Jaya has issues with the Indonesian military fighting a war against the separatist movement of the indigenous papuans, and PNG is generally lawless. It is not an area that has been well explored by Nepenthes botanists.

    Trent, I wouldn't dare say without physically seeing it, but I would dare say your plant is a form of mirabilis, which is quite common in PNG. When it flowers, it should be more helpful in identifying it.

    Hamish
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

  6. #14

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,163
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks Hamish. I had no reason to doubt it was a mirabilis until I happened upon the picture of N. papuana in Danser's book. I think Tony is correct in that the illustration is of a mirabilis and is erroneously labelled papuana. It is one of my favorite forms of mirabilis-it's quite striking.
    Perusing Danser brought up a ton of unanswered questions.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •