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Thread: Truncata: highland v lowland

  1. #33

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    I grow both highland and lowland truncata outdoors all year in Sydney, which has hot, dry (but fairly humid) summers, and cool, wet-ish, low humidity winters. My lowland truncata grow well in summer and put out huge pitchers. The highland plants also grow well in summer, although they slow a bit in the peak of the hot weather (although they continue pitchering, unlike many other highland species). In winter, the lowland plants grow painfully slowly, and the leaves and pitchers get much smaller. The highland plants grow much faster, and put out bigger leaves and pitchers. So whilst they both grow outdoors without too many problems, the lowland variety does not like continuous cool days and cold nights (with a fairly short photoperiod), whereas the highland variety copes much better. They both grow well in summer, but the lowland variety grows faster.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

  2. #34
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    My highland truncata is basically a windowsill plant. It's in a little makeshift chamber right now just because the winter is so dry. It's doing just fine. So I don't know about it needing a narrow temperature range.

  3. #35

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    Hamish,
    When your highland trunc slows down during peak heat in summer, what are the temps and conditions, especially night temps?

    Trent

  4. #36

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    Trent, you can have a look at the averages of my area at this link: http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/averag...w_066037.shtml - this is probably the station with the most similar temps to my area, although this one - http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/averag...w_066062.shtml - is physically closer, it is also close to the harbour which makes it cooler.

    Lately we've been having nights of between 18 - 22C, which most of my highlands don't like, even ventricosa stops pitchering in summer. I notice a huge difference in spring and autumn when they have huge growth spurts.

    Hamish
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

  5. #37

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    There's also a cool page that shows the current weather details that is updated every 10 minutes: http://www.bom.gov.au/products/IDN65066.shtml

    H.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

  6. #38

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    Thanks Hamish,
    Very interesting. Sydney's climate reminds me of southern California where temperatures are concerned. Our problem here in south Florida are the warm summer nights from July to the end of September. We can go for a week with night temps never dropping below 25.5 C, and those cooler nights are only a few degrees C cooler, brought on by passing thunderstorms. Generally, the humidity is very high, and at night typically hovers around the 80 percent RH. This makes swamp coolers pretty much non-functional.
    Some highland species will actually tolerate our summer, even if they may pout a bit.
    Again, thanks. We're always interested in what other growers are doing, with or to, their Nepenthes [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img] .
    T.

  7. #39

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    The highland N. truncata seems to do well for us under intermediate conditions. Our "highland" nursery is probably more intermediate at 25 deg. C day and 13 deg C night. As Hamish has pointed out, it didn;t flourish in the lowlands here but it did still grow and pitcher, not slowly die as some Neps would.

    I really have had trouble growing the lowland N. truncata. We discontinued the clones we had for legal reasons but it never grew properly for us.

    Here's a photo of one that may later be named as a cultivar since the peristome is wider than usual and doesn't roll back fully. This photo is old actually, later pitchers look better.



    Off topic, Michael Catalani has been mentiond quite a lot recently. Has anyone heard from him in recent times? He seems to have vanished off the scene shortly after he got married.
    Rob Cantley
    Nep Nut in Sri Lanka
    http://www.borneoexotics.com

  8. #40

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    Rob,
    Wow! That should be a cultivar! The color on that plant is just as interesting as if it were solid black. Have you ever figured out a percentage of color/pattern from a batch of seed or single grex? Are they mostly dark?
    PS: We posted a pic of the cantleyi, it's already buried, did you get a chance to check it out?

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