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Thread: Truncata: highland v lowland

  1. #1
    trainspotting's Avatar
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    Unhappy

    I've seen Truncatas for sale as highland and as lowland. Are there two different variations of the species or is it an arguable intermediate? Are there noticable differences between them? Is one form more expensive then the other? Anything else

    Thanks,
    Chris
    Im a terible speeler, but I are collage stodint.
    "Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent
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    the highland form is WAY more expensive than the lowland form. I do not know why though [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/confused.gif[/img]

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    The lowland form of truncata has been in cultivation for decades, and is very common. It has basically green pitchers and the peristome varies from striped to red. It is found below about 800 metres and grows well in true lowland conditions, although it tolerates highland conditions (but will grow very slowly if it is cool)

    The highland form of truncata was discovered fairly recently, and is much rarer than the lowland form. There is also only one vendor who sells it wholesale (Borneo Exotics). Highland truncata, in my view, is much more spectacular than the lowland form. It is highly coloured, varying from orange, red to purple and there's even a rare black form. Its peristome is more prominent than the lowland form, and there are a few other morphological differences. All round, it is far more attractive than the lowland form, and appears to get a bit bigger than the lowland form as well. It is found at around 1,700 metres, and needs highland conditions - Rob Cantley has some in his lowland house and has said they don't fare well at all.

    Due to it being new to cultivation, its scarcity, its attractiveness and the fact that all plants on sale at a retail level have been imported, it is much more expensive than the lowland form.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

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    Highland = high prices. Lowland is cheaper. Like Hamish said, highland is much more interesting to look at. I hope the prices on that will decrease as it is cultivated more. My lowland form was grown on my windowsill for a while, but it didn't give me any pitchers, it's happier in my stovehouse now.
    Update: Parents convinced to allow me to keep greenhouse heated over winter. Most species will not be lost. Too lazy to update growlist.

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    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Here's a photo of an unusually dark LOWLAND form of N. truncata (I think we may have posted this here before).

    The pitcher even has a dark flush on it.
    Granted, it's not all black or solid red, but then neither are most of the highland forms. This is a seedling from Geoff Mansell (red peristome x striped peristome). We have five seedlings, three have this coloration - all through our hot Florida summers. The other two are more typical looking.
    The truncata in the photo is still a young plant, not yet blooming size. We think there are excellent breeding opportunities with truncata. What coloration and tolerance would you get if this was crossed to a dark colored highland truncata?
    Interesting to note that reports are bouncing around that the lowland form is more cold tolerant (more tolerant of everything!) than the highland form.

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    fly-catchers's Avatar
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    Here is my recently aquired Highland truncata.
    So far each pitcher has doubled in size, and until winter was growing fast



    My lowland truncata is still tiny after several years, but is finally showing some growth. Currently the highland is in my greenhouse and the lowland in my kitchen.

    cheers

    bill

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    endparenthesis's Avatar
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    My highland truncata has slowed down some during the winter too... but yeah, it never seemed excruciatingly slow to me.



    This is an old picture (it has 3 more leaves now... the most recent being at least 6x the size of any of the pictured leaves). I took it right after the foreground pitcher opened to show the differences in the peristome coloring before they darken up. I'll take another picture when the new pitcher has formed.

    I got the plant from Tony.

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]and appears to get a bit bigger than the lowland form as well.
    I prefer the highland one concerning colours and such but I never knew it was larger than the lowland one.. Are we talking length, width (volume), or both here? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/phyrex/phyrex.gif[/img]

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