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Thread: Highland plants

  1. #1

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    Hey everyone,
    How much difference is there between growing conditions of N. lowii and N. hamata? I've been growing a baby N. lowii on my shelf with no special cooling system for about 3 weeks and in that time it has produced its first pitcher. How does the N. lowii's needs for successful growing compare to the other highlands. Thanks,
    Nick Z.
    It's like walking out a door and discovering it's a window.

  2. #2

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    Lowii is considered an ultrahighland plant. Hamata is considered intermediate-highland, though some consider it just highland. Lowii and hamata are both kinda picky about humidity, but lowii needs a lower night drop of temps than hamata (in to the 50s), but hamata will take it without complaint. A N. lowii and a N. hamata will both grow happily on a windowsill as long as the temps get lower at night, and the humidity is HIGH.

    In short. Lowii- Night drop in to the 50s, high humidity
    Hamata- night drop below 65, can take in to the 50s. High humidity.

    Although all highlanders can take a night drop in to the fifties without complaint, lowii needs it for best growth.

    hope i helped. I may have missed a few things, but others will be able to fill them in.
    Update: Parents convinced to allow me to keep greenhouse heated over winter. Most species will not be lost. Too lazy to update growlist.

  3. #3

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    Actually, altitudinal ranges for both these species overlap greatly. Specifically, N. lowii: 1800-2600 m; N. hamata 1400-2500 m (cf. Clarke, NOB, p. 96, and M. Jebb and M. Cheek, A Skeletal Revision of Nepenthes (Nepenthaceae), Blumea 42(1), 1997, p. 47, respectively).

    Should remark that I do not consider either of these to be ultrahighland plants. Both do well with overnight lows in the mid 50s to about 60 F. I have grown both for a number of years under identical conditions (side by side, really) quite successfully.

  4. #4

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    We grow both these species together as typical highlanders, neither should be considered 'ultrahighland' IMO. That adjective should be reserved for species such as N. villosa that tolerate frost or near frost in habitat.

    N. hamata is much faster growing than N. lowii if the conditions are the same although being a faster grower N. hamata has softer tissues and won't pitcher easily if the humidity isn't kept constantly high.
    Rob Cantley
    Nep Nut in Sri Lanka
    http://www.borneoexotics.com

  5. #5

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    HI all:

    I do believe that Lowii is a plant which can grow under different cultural requirements (different temps). Hamata does the same, but as Rob said, the humidity needs to be high for them to pitcher.

    Gus

  6. #6

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    I have found that lowii is pretty lenient when the night lows are in the low 60s, but i have seen the best growth in my plant when the low was about 55F. Hamata is definitely more temp tolerant though.
    Update: Parents convinced to allow me to keep greenhouse heated over winter. Most species will not be lost. Too lazy to update growlist.

  7. #7
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Humidity is a must for these species. In the heating season (now) my plants suffer from the heaters heat fins that rapidly dry the air out. Its only in the early early spring, when heating ceases (or is minimal) that the plants look great in the cool wet spring days and nights.

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