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Thread: Easy neps to grow?

  1. #1

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    I assume all the lowland Neps are relatively easy to grow, and fue to the temperature requirements, the highland neps are harder, especially for me, here in Houston. In the summer, I can't keep my house below 70-75 deg F, even at night.

    So, my question is: Are there any picky lowland species I may want to stay away from, and are there any highland species that are fairly tolerant of higher temps?

    I know NepG has recommended using ice packs and misting, but I prefer to create an environment inside a growth chamber that doesn't require a lot of additional babysitting.
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  2. #2
    Flip_Side_the_Pint's Avatar
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    well lowlanders can be easy but I think the key is consistancy. I would stay away from northiana, bicalcarata, veillardii, merriliana, and campanulata. Those like lots of humidity and my experiecne suffer greatly if it drops even for a few hours. My bical and camp seem to be most effected by humidity drops. I was cleaning the chamber out one day and left the door open for maybe a max of 4 hours. The next day my bical and my camp dropped a pitcher each. The bical suffered the most and is still recovering. Merriliana and northiana seem to like the consistancy the most. It took my merriliana almost two months to even think about pitchering. I've notced that just moving their pots around causes a slow in growth for about a week

    As far as easy low landers I would say get some hybrids to start off with.
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    N. northiana can be extramly picky about humidity as is N. bicalcarata. i wouldnt get these unless you can insure constant high humidity. good ones to try would be N. ampullaria, graclilis and many many hybrids. N. x ventrata, although a highland hybrid is very adaptable though kinda bland in my opinion. N. xMiranda is also a very showy hybrid that will probably do well. if you can find 'Ile de France' i highly recomend it. personally i find low elevation highlanders far easier than true lowlanders. N. bongso and a highland form of N. veitchii are thriving in my house with lil extra effort from me. basically decide what your most interested in that you can provide fairly close conditions for and go for it.
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    Stay away from northiana. Bical has been hardier for me than the above give credit for. Truncata will be great. Albomarginata, reinwardtiana, lowland forms of alata, ventricosa (highland), should all do well.
    Update: Parents convinced to allow me to keep greenhouse heated over winter. Most species will not be lost. Too lazy to update growlist.

  5. #5
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    I don't know why so many people scream "stay away from N. northiana". It really isn't that hard if you know how it grows in the wild, and most importantly, leave the dang thing alone. I have one and sure, its reluctant to pitcher, but it grows and is alive at least. Plus, its the spring, not really its playtime yet. But for N. northiana, general rule of thumb, remember, humid and shady.

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    How does N. northiana compare to N. sumatrana for pickiness? I don't have the former, but the latter is going crazy on me! I was wondering if I should try a N. northiana....

    Cheers,

    Joe

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    Update: Parents convinced to allow me to keep greenhouse heated over winter. Most species will not be lost. Too lazy to update growlist.

  8. #8
    Flip_Side_the_Pint's Avatar
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    I think people say stay away from Northiana because it hates being moved and isn't that fast of a grower sometimes. There for people may move it arond or change its conditions around to often since they think its not happy. Doing that makes it stop over and over again. To the point where it either dies or they don't want the plant anymore. I'm just speculating.
    https://www.instagram.com/hull.jess/ (I post pics of my plants there)

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