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Thread: New lowland hybrid!

  1. #1

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    Hi,
    recently just did a lowland hybrid: N.mirabillis red X N. gracillis
    I know these arent popular or fantastic plants but still is fun. It seems this is the first of its kind so far and, being the first hybrid I have ever created, would like to know several things:
    1. How long does it take for seed pod or fruit to mature? I am going to tissue culture the seeds so would need to know when I can harvest (must be ripened fruit yet before fruit burst)
    2. Does more genetic characteristics come from the mother or father parent plant? I heard from some orchid hybridizers that characteristics may come more from 1 parent.
    3. How long (average) does it take highlanders to flower, since "birth" I have flowering lowlanders but so far I noticed the plants are atleast 6years old before they begin flowering and the stems of mine nearly 5 metres long before the first spikes emerge whereas I have seen barely 2 feet tall highlanders flowering and thinking that hybridizing these "fast flowerers" may be quite fun.
    4. Lastly, I know this is counting chickens before the egg hatches but How do I register a new hybrid?
    Not the first time tissue culturing seeds but 1st time for hybridizing
    Will post pics of seed pods soon and maybe parent plants. The flower was pollinated 4 weeks ago.
    Thanks

  2. #2

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    Hi Lam,
    Will try to give an accurate answer to each question without getting too detailed.
    1. Seed pod maturation will depend on the species or the background of the plant. Generally, before the pod bursts, you can see a color change-towards a bronze or brown-a keep a close watch on the "seams" of the pod. You can tell when they will burst. Time frame would be 2-4 months, so watch them carefully.
    2. good question. Generally, the progeny will have more resemblance to the pod parent, but it can be very close to 50-50.
    3. This depends on the species. Lowland giant species like bicalcarata or rafflesiana gigantea can take a long time to bloom, but so does macrophylla, villosa or edwardsiana. I believe one of the members of this forum bloomed a N. lowii within 4 or five years after obtaining it as a small plant.
    4. Nepenthes are officially not treated like orchids. While hybrids have been named in orchid fashion, it is not officially recognized by the International Registration Authority. Man- made Nepenthes hybrids use the cultivar system of naming: individual plants of worthy stature are given a non scientific name. To be "official" , a description must be published in an appropriate journal or book.
    Hope this is helpful!

  3. #3
    Flip_Side_the_Pint's Avatar
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    I'd like to see this plant if you're able to collect some viable seed.
    https://www.instagram.com/hull.jess/ (I post pics of my plants there)

  4. #4

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    wow, six weeks passes so quickly, this is the newest pic I got, hope someone can tell me if its going to split soon, yes, the description seems to match... should I tc it now? Or am I just excited too quickly?


    here's my gallery with pic of the parents, as you can see, the hybrid doesnt seem very interesting as both parents are nearly similar plants! but still, for the experience and just fun...

    http://nep-hybrids.mypicgallery.com

    thanks

  5. #5

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    Wonderful.

  6. #6

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    Lam,

    You need to wait for the pods to start going brown before harvesting the seed. The ends of the pods will also start to split a bit - this is a good indication the pod is ripe.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

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