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Thread: Truncata

  1. #17

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    Joachim,
    Is that the highland truncata that is in tissue culture in Europe?

  2. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Trent @ May 19 2005,9:10)]Is that the highland truncata that is in tissue culture in Europe?
    Hi trent,

    this is the highland N. truncata Thomas Carow sells through garden centers for quite low prices. He is working together with Andreas, so it might be the same plant Andreas offers.

    Joachim

  3. #19
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    Here's mine's latest pitcher (I had posted this elsewhere, too, I think, but it's good for comparisson's sake):
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/schloaty/highland%20trunc.jpg[/img]

    The pot it's in is 4" (5cm), so that makes the total pitcher height between 6 and 7"
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

  4. #20

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    well you guys were right, I dont think a pitcher is even going to form at all!! There is already a new leaf that has the start of a pitcher that is already more developed then the big leafed one. Weird. This plant is making so much "nectar" that is just runs down into the pitchers.
    I wonder if I did somthing wrong to make it put out such a huge leaf with no pitcher? Everything else seems fine.

  5. #21

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    Joachim,

    Interesting to see the plant sold as highland truncata from Thomas Carow. It seems to be a bit different morphologically from the highland truncata from Borneo Exotics. One difference you can see between the standard lowland and highland variety from BE is that with the lowland one the new leaves start to unfurl from the middle of the petiole, then slowly form a 'D' shape until just the pitcher is enclosed in the petiole, then the pitcher is finally released. With the highland variety, the pitcher grows out of the petiole first, then the leaf comes out in more or less one stage. I see in the picture of you highland one that it has the same growth habit as the lowland ones in that respect. Maybe this is a third variation of the species, or some intermediate variety.

    There are a couple of other morphological features between the highland and lowland varieties, but I can't see enough to tell from your photo. Rob Cantley is the guru when it comes to the subtle differences of the two.

    Hamish
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

  6. #22
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Joachim, I mean the flared upper peristome, and larger sizes.

  7. #23

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    Hi Hamish,

    it has been a long time I grew the lowland form so I can't make direct comparisons. AFAIK the 'highland' form hasn't been formally described, though I believe that the form from Thomas Carow is very similar to the highland form Rob offers. Here is a pic of an unfurling leaf, maybe it might help identifying it:

    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/joachim/N_truncata_250505.jpg[/img]

    Ah, and yes Rob has seen this clone in person and he has identified it as highland form.

    Cheers Joachim

  8. #24

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    Looking at it closely, you can see another indicator of the highland form, and that is it's rich, orange down - the highland form is much more hirsute than the lowland one.

    H.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

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