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Thread: Evolution of nepenthes

  1. #9

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    that would apply to any plant that has proven of value to humans. Look at modern hybrid vegetables like corn, watermelon, tomatoes et cetera. They are definitely 'evolved' by humans, compared to their 'wild' counterparts.
    As for Neps., the reason for the extreme forms such as found in Sumatra and Borneo is hypothesised in Charles Clarke's books. Competition with each other creates the diversity. Where several Neps grow together in the same habitat, they tend to specialize in the prey they attract. Where there is only one species present, the tendency is towards a somewhat plain looking trap. Of course, its all theory that sort of holds together. There's always exceptions.

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    As Nepenthes move into and populate the monsoonal zone, you can see the evolution of thickened leaves (viking, rowanae) and thickened rootstalks and stems bases (viking, kampotiana, thorellii) and seasonal deciduousness (thorelli, kampotina). As Nepenthes continue to colonize seasonally wet areas, they may evolve succulence. Imagine a caudiciform nepenthes! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_k_ani_32.gif[/img]

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    God I love this thread! It restores my faith in discussion boards [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

  4. #12
    trainspotting's Avatar
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    My opinion on human involvement is that these plants, I'm thinking mostly orchids, have accidently evolved one of the best plant adaptations: they've caught the eye of a species willing to invest huge amounts of energy to propagate and spread these plants.
    So really which is the intelligent species, the one that wastes(from an evolutionary standpoint; i love my plants) tons of energy, or the one that capatalizes on the other by making colorful flowers?

    Cool thread
    Chris
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  5. #13

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    I would think Neps that are alone on an island with a reasonable amount of bugs (so most of indonesia) would remain relitively unchanged since any change would not reasonably result in a reproductive advantage.

  6. #14
    rattler's Avatar
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    islands do funny things to evolution. you have more compitition. evolution isnt always a slow long, drwn out process. when you have an island, especially smaller ones it tends to kick evolution into overdrive. animals and plants are forced to adapt to a niche or niches rather quickly in order to survive.
    cervid serial killer
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  7. #15
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    would everyone consider natural hybridization a form of evolution?

    would you consider cultivation a form of artificial/controlled evolution?

    selective breeding?

  8. #16

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    Yep. Evolution is not some slow steady process.
    As for the Indochina Neps, I agree with Slurm. These monsoonal Neps are all fairly recent. Same for Australia. It seems these forms of mirabilis are rapidly differentiating.
    Hamish. Educate me a bit on Australian geology. Was there an ice age below the equator within the same time frame as the great ice sheets that covered the northern continents?

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