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Thread: Evolution of nepenthes

  1. #17

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    I beleve there was since climate is sort of a global thing. You do have a point I was jsut thinking of N. madigascarensis which is probibly a more primitive Nep. I found some site today (can;t remember which one) that said the Madigarcarensis group (apparently Neps are broken down into groupings throught DNA analysis) is the most primitive and is thought to have originally started when Madigascar was connected to Afro-India and some plants in Europe were probibly the beginning of that. Since Nep seeds are so light they could supposedly be spread across Indoneasia. I never saw the stats on what Neps were in What group so I can't say I beleive all of it since I could not see all the Info.

  2. #18

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    Natural selection is survival of the fittest, and only those who survive pass on genes. Artificial selection is when humans breed animals or plants for desired characteristics.

    On evolution being slow and steady, i though it happened in bursts sometimes. During major climate changes everything died off and those that could survive rapidly reproduced and were ussually different then the previous population.

    My bio teacher would be proud of this post.

  3. #19

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    True Tony but not random bursts only after a major disaster for that ecosystem and only enough of the one species survived to breed genetically limited off-spring which then had a reporductive advantage and thus came the rise of new species. I don't think that sentance missed anything. The thing I would be interested in is humans breeding: Artifical or Natural selection? I suppose it would be natural until someone (usually slaves) are forced to breed.

  4. #20

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    Some animals moved out of the sea and onto dry land to survive.
    Some animals have adapted by growing wings and flying.
    Cows taste good, so humans make sure they survive. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img] Just a thought.

  5. #21

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    Really nice discussion!

    I have got another example for 'recent' mutations: Ne. lowii. It grows at Gunung Mulu, Trusmadi and Gunung Murud. And all forms got different pitchers. So the pitchers of Gunung Murud and Trusmadi are smaller than those of the Gunung Mulu variety.

  6. #22

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    Nepenthes are truly an old species. First it exhibits a prehistoric pollination method of being dioecious (separate sexes on separate plants), examples of dioecious flowering occurs in other prehistoric old plants (i.e. cycads).

    These plants had to evolve to insectivorousness due to lack of nutrients in their heath-bogs and rocky outcroppings. A significant supply in water was the determining factor in allowing diversity to happen. Even to this day, nepenthes can only occupy areas where rainfall is high. These plants lack any succulence or thickened stems or tissues that allow these plants to sit through droughts. Thus steady and reliable rainfall was not a factor in developing these plants. So since water was not scarce or difficult to obtain, these plants had to adapt to other strategies related to the environment. Since many nepenthes occupy areas where soil nutrients were poor or the soil had high concentrations of serpentine or ultramific layers, this prevented other plant species which are more faster and evasive from getting established. It is my belief that many nepenthes species rely on the shelter of a more aggressive species to get a start next to. These competitors started out with ample supply of nutrients and moisture, but eventually their roots ran into a higher PH soil or soils where calcium, magnesium and lime was high, thus stunting its growth and preventing an otherwise evasive species to outshadow the weaker and slow growing nepenthes. Nepenthes which have the ability to trap its own food for nitrogen and other trace minerals, soon could get a faster foothold on their environment and soil nutrient and combined with an endless supply of water and sunlight, now can overtake the small stunted tree or sapling.

    What I also believe is that many nepenthes are high pH requirement growers and many people do not realize that they need this in order to develop properly. I believe that many nepenthes grow acidically in the seedling age and until their root system digs deeper into the substrate, they will soon require a higher pH soil. It is simple to understand that nepenthes grows acidly. Most upper layers over a bedrock of coral (as with most of the pacific islands) have a shallow decomposed region of plant material making a thin layer of acid or composted material. Once the plant penetrates this layer, then and only then do they exhibit some of their true characteristics.

    I have a plant labeled northiana x (spectabilis x veitchii) and since I read somewhere that northiana grow in a very basic soil, I repotted it into a deeper pot with the bottom third composed of pure coral chips. I added layers of coco bark and fir bark and even coarse peat moss and hapu'u (fern fiber) to this mixture.
    I later learned that this wasn't a northiana cross, but a bicalcarata cross and by then the plant had developed into a very heavy growing species with leathery leaves and robust pitchers. I have another clone of this same cross growing in a different area in lmost pure peat and coco bark mix. It is softer and more bigger leafed than the plant in this media.

    Oh well, I seem to be going off track. I will perhaps start another section with regards to this topic. Sorry for boring everyone.

    More later,

    M
    Morticia:\"Sic gorgiamus allos subjectatos nunc, 'We would gladly feast on those who try to subdue us.' Not just pretty words. but words to live by!\"

  7. #23

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    Rainforest Guy that it a very interesting observation. Hmm I should try it on something.

  8. #24

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    interesting post RainforestGuy. still pondering...Thanks. Welcome by the way!
    Ok guys, so what do you think caused the evolution of the large teeth in edwardsiana, and macrophylla? perhaps a large insect now extinct that could work its way out of a regular peristomed nep, but could not escape the larger stiffer hooks of edwardsiana? I am truly baffled by this. there has to be a reason...

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