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Thread: Evolution of nepenthes

  1. #33

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    i agree Machete the toothier ones look like they are for keeping things inside the pitcher, Thus my question. What they heck is edwardsiana trying to keep from escaping? Some Giant agro bug that can climb the inside of the pitcher, but cant get it's legs past the hooks? Same question for upper hamata pitchers. I know the teeth function by making the ants get to the sharpest point to get nectar, and of course they can't hold on, and slip in, so that makes sense for something like villosa or hamata... more teeth. more places for insects to feed and slip, but edwardsiana only has like 10 teeth. Not very efficient for feeding, so they must be for keeping something in. right?
    Please forgive my amatuer questions.
    Robin

  2. #34
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    Perhaps it's keeping smaller vertebrates like birds out? Or smaller, insectivorous primates like tarsiers? Certainly, they wouldn't have the strength to tear open very large pitchers. Even in the case of edwardsiana, I don't think that feeding is out of the question either, because you don't need lots of hooks to make the bugs climb out on a limb and fall in - you only need one. N. edwarsiana could be moving towards less hooks because it's easier to produce a few and just as effective for trapping. The Heliamphoras seem to do just fine with one nectar cap.
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

  3. #35

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    What about lizards? I mean keeping them out. You know they look in everywhere so in bical if they backed up to fast (wack) and you you have a speared lizard. And beleve me you can punch two little holes in your skin with a bical pitcher by mistake. I will NEVER pur my finger in a bical pitcher again that hurt like no other.

    As a side note anyone have any idea why mnay species and hybrids have pink-purple splotches on the upper half of the inside of the pitcher? Do you think it is supposed to attract something?

  4. #36

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    just saw this post... :-/. I didn't read it all, just a couple of the last replies.
    didn't someone post a picture of a bical where ants crawled down the teeth and later fell and was digested? maybe teeth in bicals and other species help by leading the insects and making them fall (doesn't the nectar make them drunk?)
    but what about the spikes on the lids of some like lowii and that other relative of lowii?
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  5. #37
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    The spines on lowii are thought to attract birds, which defecate in the pitchers. If you look on the uppers of a healthy lowii, you're supposed to be able to find little white balls of nectar. The birds sit on the pitcher to eat the nectar and leave a little 'foliar feed' behind.
    Tre, I've read that the splotchy color pattern is supposed to 'lead' insects somehow, but the cause and effect behind it never seems to follow whenever I encounter it.
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

  6. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (JustLikeAPill @ May 24 2005,12:32)]if N. madagascarensis is the oldest, that's interesting since it's rather unremarkable, unlike N. hamata or N. platychilla or others.
    definitely makes sense though, right? like when cars first came along, nearly every single one was a standard model T... now there's everything from Mini Coopers to Hummers.

    start with the basics then specialize as needed [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]
    (edit: hehehe yeah i know i catch on late... but this is definitely an awesome thread!)

    aren't there a few nep species that have a symbiotic relationship with ants? the name escapes me but i think i saw a National Geographic article on them at some point. i wonder when/how that came about....
    "Seeds? Oh yeah... sometimes I forget they grow from those. I feel like they should hatch or something."

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  7. #39

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    I think those downward pointing teeth would be for ants and whatnot to teeter on the edge and then slip into the trap. I suppose it would make it a bit harder for an insect or whatnot to get out.
    1 Nxventrata

    D. muscipula & D. muscipula 'Red Dragon'(barely)

    Sarracenia leucophylla(seedling)

    S. purpurea and Drosera filiformis filiformis/ intermedia seeds waiting to sprout.

    Drosera capensis

  8. #40
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    Moonflower, I've heard that lots of different Neps will dry out their traps but still secrete nectar from the leaves during droughts in order to keep their affiliated ant colonies healthy. There are some more sophisticated adaptions as well, but I just think it's neat that they feed the ants without trapping them.
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

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