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Thread: What is going on with this thing?

  1. #1

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    I bought this N. x ventrata back in February and hung it in a window in my bathroom, it has been growing vigorously and more than doubled in size since the purchase,however the mother plant will not produce any new pitchers. The new leaves have tendrills which look like they should produce pitchers but don't. The funny thing is, since purchasing it, it has sent up a couple of basal shoots that have pitchered, but they don't look anything like the mother plant pitchers, they are rather hairy and about 1.5 inches tall is this normal. The pitchers you see have lasted over 4 months. Any suggestions on getting the mother plant to pitcher?

    Thanks,

    Jason


    Mother Plant



    basal pitcher


  2. #2

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    Jason,

    Conditions probably aren't right for the main vine to pitcher. You'll get pitchers from basal shoots in less than required conditions due to their proximity to the medium and the associated higher humidity. Often those pitchers are first 'triggered' whilst the tendril is still under, or just on, the soil, so air conditions are less important.

    As for the difference in the lower pitcher, basals can throw out pitchers that are closer in characteristic to seedling pitchers. This is what you're seeing in that photo. As more pitchers form on the basals, they will be more like normal lower pitchers.

    Hamish
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

  3. #3

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    Thanks for the reply Hamish. Will the main vine eventually aclimate and produce pitchers, or am I going to have to change conditions? Other than not pitchering, the plant is vigorous and healthy. I'm guessing it's lack of humidity if anything, it recieves a good deal of light but the humidity is somewhere around 40% is all. I was hoping to be able to grow this plant as hanging window plant.

  4. #4
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    My 2 ventratas went throught the exact same thing. The vine with the curling tendrils are finally starting to produce pitchers. It took a few months to aclimate I guess.

    Good luck on yours! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]
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  5. #5

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    Given the type of hybrid it is, if it hasn't acclimated itself within 6 months, I doubt it will. If you've still no pitchers in September, I'd move it somewhere with higher humidity.

    Hamish
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

  6. #6
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    One other thought: You say it's in the bathroom window...How much light does that mean? What direction does the window face? North, south, east or west? I find that sometimes light is a more important factor than humidity (within reason).
    17 Nash Rd.
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  7. #7

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    It's in a west facing window, so it recieves indirect light until about1:30 PM and then recieves direct sunlight from about 1:30 to 6:30 PM and then again recieves indirect light until dark.

  8. #8

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    As you've stated that humidity is around 40%, I would say that is too low for pitchering if it remains that way for any period of time. As a general rule, average humidity of around 50% would be needed for easier species and hybrids.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

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