User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Semi-hydroponic

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    470
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Has anyone tried to grow Nepenthes using semi-hydroponic (S/H) culture? My S/H experience with Nepenthes is limited to growing a couple of cuttings in S/H for a couple of months. So far, they seem to be doing just as well as other cuttings that were planted at the same time in LFS. But I wonder what the long term prospects are.

    For those who are not familiar with S/H, itís a way of growing plants in a container with inert material. The container has drainage holes, not at the bottom, but about an inch from the bottom, so that any extraneous water drains out, and there is always a bit of water in the container. Some orchid growers swear by S/H. Clay pellets are often recommended as a medium for growing orchids in S/H because they wick up water from the bottom of the container. (However, the clay pellets are quite expensive where I live, so I am using just plain gravel that has been washed.) Many orchids thrive on low nutrient media with moist, but not wet, conditions. Since Nepenthes in general like those conditions as well, it seems like S/H should work. Has anyone tried it for any substantial length of time? For more information about S/H (geared toward orchid growers, though), see www.firstrays.com/hydro.htm.

  2. #2
    rattler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    missing, presumed dead
    Posts
    8,554
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    it may work, actually when i get ahold of some of those clay balls i plan on trying it. nit sure if i will start with a cutting and let it go from there or if i will sacrifice my N. x ventrata fo the experiment. in theory it should work, i would think.
    cervid serial killer
    Know guns, know peace, know safety. No guns, no peace, no safety
    I didn't get stimulated but he kept his promise on change, that's about all I got left!
    http://www.wolfpointherald.com/--http://www.safety-brite.net/

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
    Posts
    2,974
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Heiko Reisher(sp?) had an aricle in CPN years ago about using a 100% inorganic medium, consisting of lava pebbles, lectacon and seramis(the latter two being clay perl-tye items). It required lots of watering and the use of some osmocote, but repotting was not required. The pots were netted pots.
    Is this what you were getting towards?

    Cheers,

    Joe

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    california
    Posts
    415
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have tried using those clay pellets with hamata. I used 1oo% clay pellets in a regular pot, but mesh would have been better. The plant did OK, but I agree, it needs a lot of watering ...several times a day. Might want to try some kind of timed watering device, or flood and drain system.
    Robin

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    470
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Joe and Robin: Sorry I didn't do such a good job of explaining S/H. Regular pots or net pots won't work for S/H. You would need something like a large plastic bottle with a large opening (without the cover, of course), or a quart size plastic container that you might get at a deli (a large cup, really). Make two or three small holes (about one-fourth inch in diameter) in the side of the container about an inch from the bottom of the container. Then plant the Nepenthes in the container using the inert medium. When you water the plant, any excess water will flow out the holes. About an inch of water will remain in the bottom. Due to wicking action or humidity the remainder of the medium (or most of it, anyway) will stay moist. You won't have to water the plant again until the water at the bottom of the pot completely evaporates, which may be a few days, depending on climatic conditions. If you do water it before that, no problem, because the excess water will flow out the holes.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •