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Thread: Suitable temps for new hybrids

  1. #1

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    I am thinking of getting the following hybrids

    N. x predator
    N. truncata x lowii
    N. truncata x aristolochioides
    N. veitchii highland x veitchii lowland

    would they do well in temps of
    Day 78f Night 68f
    in other words, standard household temps/ coolish lowland temps.
    My N. x medusa (bellii x sibuyanensis) is growing well in those temps.
    Would any of them do well in these temps?
    Also, is N. truncata highland an intermediate or a true highland? I would like to hear if anyone has had sucess with these plants in household temps.

  2. #2

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    N. x predator will not work. I can't remember what the other parent is, but the hamata in it makes it VERY sensitive to higher temps and lower humidity. Truncata can be either lowland, highland or intermediate depending on what the variety is. Highlands have richer colouration and are far more expensive, while lowlands have more green and are pretty cheap. Then there are intermediate hybrids between the two. Truncata x lowii might work, as might truncata x aristolochioides. The veitchii hybrid sounds like it definately might work. Hope it helps.

    -D. Lybrand
    Check my growlist! Nothing currently available for trade...

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    Predator is N. truncata x hamata. I live in Hawaii, lowland conditions. My N. Predator is currently in a three gallon pot and has pitchers close to ten inches long. I've had them since they were first offered about mid/late of 2004.

    I believe you mean N. lowii x truncata by EP. I am not sure of anyone who has a N. truncata x lowii as this would be a nice big plant! This grows very fast and steady in full sun conditions here.

    N. truncata x aristolochioides grows also well, but is slow to start off, soon it will grow rather steadily. I did post a new post regarding sizes of N. qristolochioides crosses. I currently grow this one small in a small hanging basket subject. Pitchers of this cross (for me any way) is about four to five inches on a plant diameter of ten. Anyone has this cross on a larger plant? Larger pitcher?

    As for veitchii highland x lowland, it grows, but starts off very slow, the soon one leaf after the other becomes larger and larger each time.


    Try N. sibuyanensis hybrids, they will do well for you as well!

    Michael
    Morticia:\"Sic gorgiamus allos subjectatos nunc, 'We would gladly feast on those who try to subdue us.' Not just pretty words. but words to live by!\"

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    Those are all highland x lowland hybrids, so should result in intermediate. I would think as long as other conditions(light, hymidity, compost) are accepatable, all those would work.
    Anybody else?

    Cheers,

    Joe

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    My lowii x veitchii is growing equally well, I have plants over 20 inches across with pitchers close to seven inches long! The colors are the best I've seen in any lowii hybrid to date and so variable. I have pitchers that are solid ruby red with a darker red, lime green and orange striped peristome. Others are rust-brown color with red flushes around peristome with a deep blackish red peristome and lime stripes.
    Another favorite cross of hughlands is N. eymae x (stenophylla x lowii) very fancy peristomes on a mottled maxima-like pitcher. N. eymae x spectabilis looks like a grand form of N. speactabilis x veitchii. Another highland hybrid I like is my N. burbidgeae x edwardsiana with a leaf spread of eighteen inches and long tendrils with large pitchers on them. Macfarlanei x sibuyanensis also gets huge for both plants being highlanders. I strongly believe in culture and maintainance in making highland species and hybrids thrive in any climate!

    Michael
    Morticia:\"Sic gorgiamus allos subjectatos nunc, 'We would gladly feast on those who try to subdue us.' Not just pretty words. but words to live by!\"

  6. #6

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    We can verify what Michael stated in our south Florida conditions. Truncata lowland passes on its toughness to its progeny. Geoff Mansell claims that lowland truncata is more tolerant of the cold than highland truncata, which is intolerant of extremes. Our spathulata x truncata is a brute. Our three young truncata x densiflora laugh in the face of hot muggy nights!! Same for thorelii x densiflora, which bloomed in 92 F days and continues to vine up towards the roof, continuing to produce elongated red upper pitchers. Our sibuyanensis x ventricosa is producing pitchers bigger than the plant! It's now entering its second summer with us, where nights will not drop below 74 F until mid October.
    Our highland veitchii x lowland veitchii does better in the summer because the daylight hours are longer. Temps are not a problem.
    Like Michael said-proper culture and maintainence.

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    Thanks Trent for your insight. I believe that any hybrid will show vigor even if they are both highlanders. Even straight species will show resistance/tolerance to warmth.
    If somone had difficulties earlier with a given hybrid or "highland" I would say that it was most likely due to a poor start, inadequate growing conditions or something was not met, as my highland hybrods grows much faster than the true lowlanders that suppose to grow like "weeds!"

    Give it a try at least. At best you could be enjoying more variety than you think!

    Michael
    Morticia:\"Sic gorgiamus allos subjectatos nunc, 'We would gladly feast on those who try to subdue us.' Not just pretty words. but words to live by!\"

  8. #8
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    so your telling me i can grow x predator in my "ultra" lowland contions, michael and trent?

    i'm afriad to "give it a try" considering it's expensive for a plant.

    so sorry to hijack your thread!

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