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Thread: Mealy bugs and nepenthes

  1. #9
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    I too find it very odd that you never see theese things moving. It's really baffling. Maybe I should take my plants to one of the colleges around here, and see if someone there can identify the pest.

  2. #10
    Capslock's Avatar
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    What are these foul things??!!



    Capslock
    Malo Periculosam Libertatem Quam Quietum Servitium

    My photos are copyright-free and public domain

  3. #11

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    Those are mealybugs, my friend. The pestilence of the horticultural world has arrived at your doorstep, it seems. Or at least, one of them...

    -D. Lybrand
    Check my growlist! Nothing currently available for trade...

  4. #12

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    Actually, those are called 'Whitefly'. Those are the egg/larval cases. The hatchlings suck the plant juices out from inside the case. The adult is a small whitish colored fly. They can be seen flitting around the plant, sitting on the leaves. However, they spend most of their time down in the potting mix, where they mate. The females then lay more little elongated white dots that suck your plant dry of vital life fluids. They often return to the area where they hatched, because, if you're a whitefly, it was a successful place to breed. This whole life cycle takes about ten days to two weeks.
    Whenever we see them in the greenhouse, I take action immediately. First step-remove the white dots. As recommended to me by a Florida Agricultural agent: mix rubbing alcohol and water 50/50. Add a few drops of liquid soap, like dish washing detergent. Soak a cotton swab in this mixture and gently scrub off the white dots. Be thorough-these little suckers like to hide in leaf crevasses and undersides of leaves. Once removed, I like to rinse off the plant with purified water.
    Next step-eradicate the adults. For this you should use an insecticide. Whitefly adults are not tough. Any standard insecticide will work. Spray the infected plant and the surface of the potting mix. Spray the potting mix surface of adjacent plants.
    Check the infected plant a week later and remove any new white dots using the same procedure. Repeat the insecticide spraying 10 days to two weeks later. I find preventative treatment is best. We never have problems with them anymore-nor scale or mealybug.
    Bye bye whitefly.

    Trent

  5. #13
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    Then how come I never see the flies flying around? All I ever see are the immobile white things.

  6. #14

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    I have good success uisng Merit every ten days. I also use very hot water through a mist bottle and burn the hell out of them!
    I have way too many plants and many are inaccessible to swab alcohol. These are tough little guys. Its interesting that they are not associated with ants and they get around on their own. Its also interesting that they persist even on dried foliage and remain after the leaf/pitcher/tendril dies.

    Avid also works well, but this is too expensive for regular use. I have also alternated with Orthene WP (wettable powder) with positive success.

    Also removing very damaged leaves and pitchers helps cut down the breeding population.

    Michael
    Morticia:\"Sic gorgiamus allos subjectatos nunc, 'We would gladly feast on those who try to subdue us.' Not just pretty words. but words to live by!\"

  7. #15
    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
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    Many mealy bug species come in many different shapes and forms. I personally have never actually seen a mealy bug and i dont often see aphids around here either... or jap beetles... or gypsy moth...



    mebbi my climate does have some pluses [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img]
    that makes no logic

  8. #16

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    No guys, the pic on the previous page is a whitefly, not a mealy bug. We'll see if we can get a pic of a mealy bug... they almost look fluffy, like cotton. They are not the same as whitefly.

    lol, the whitefly are tiny, and you may not see them around. The little white dots are egg cases of this whitefly. We have had good results with Orthene, but now we use Talstar and haven't seen a whitefly attack since our first application.
    Just spraying the plant with a non-systemic (like Talstar) does have disadvantages - because once the plant produces new leaves, they are unprotected by the insecticide. Orthene is a systemic, which means the plant absorbs it and is inoculated for several months.

    Whitefly is tough to get rid of, but we did it. Michael, I have spent a lot of time cleaning leaves with the cotton swab, it really helps to control the problem.

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