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Thread: N.anamensis

  1. #1

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    I have a N.anamensis which I got from wistuba..He says that its lowland on his website.
    I have read many that grows it like a highland.
    But then I read that it grows in about 1500M above Sea level.
    Mine grows in extrem lowland climate and it has already produced 2 pitcher on 2 new leaves in less then a month..
    So it dosent suffer..But would like to know which coditions you guys grows it in.. Would be fun to know...
    Need all the experience I can get...

  2. #2

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    Ty,
    I bought one from Wistuba last year and it burned up on my windowsill within one day. It was extremely sensitive to transplant shock. If I recall, anamensis is a variety of N. mirabilis. I know that the leaves are very papery like mirabilis and therefore prefer high humidity. If this plant is a variety of mirabilis, it could be grown in both environments since mirabilis is found in lowland and highland altitudes. (If my memory serves from the CP books!) But if I had to grow it, I'd probably grow it as a lowlander in high humidity. If down the road the plant isn't doing well for you, you can always change the environment to accommodate the plant as well.

    Joel
    Nepenthes Around the House

  3. #3

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    This is another taxonomically confused area. True anamensis is not a synonym for mirabilis, even though some forms of indochinese mirabilis are sold as such. True anamensis is considered an intermediate, and most likely originated from one of the mountains in northeastern Thailand. As for cultivation, it is best treated like khasiana, sort of growing both highland and lowland. Joel's warning is a good one. Keep the humidity high in the summer months.

  4. #4

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    I purchased a rooted cutting of N. anamensis from EP a while ago and it just stood motionless for months, then all of a sudden it took off sending out one leaf after another with many nice pitchers. Again two growth types, "Greenhouse" and Ultra Highland" growers!

    Michael

    btw, N. anamensis has beautiful hot pink pitchers!
    Morticia:\"Sic gorgiamus allos subjectatos nunc, 'We would gladly feast on those who try to subdue us.' Not just pretty words. but words to live by!\"

  5. #5

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    Exotica Plants lists anamensis as a variety of mirabilis. They have the pink variety N. mirabilis (e) that Michael refers to and anothe variety (f) I think from Thailand. Anyhow they don't have it as a separate species and they list it as a lowlander. Wistuba lists his as a lowlander but doesn't declare it as a variety of mirabilis. So I think there's wide confusion with this plant. Maybe the confusion is similar to bongso and carunculata. I do grow a few mirabilis outdoors, but not with great success. They appear to need very high humidity as opposed to warmer temperatures. Those papery leaves really hurt me in trying to grow them outside of a greenhouse or terrarium.

    Joel

  6. #6

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    Yep. Geoff's anamensis and smilesii are actually forms of mirabilis...and very nice ones at that! True anamensis can be seen at Nepenthesofthailand.com. The one pictured on the homepage is one of the elongated forms, but this species is appearing to be extremely variable. The reason I mention smilesii is the current taxonomic confusion with indochina Nepenthes. Smilesii may be the correct name for anamensis, based on the rules of taxonomic nomenclature. (it was named smilesii first) They appear to be synonyms.

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