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Thread: Greenhouse hardening

  1. #1

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    Hey guys. I have often read of people greenhouse hardening plants that didn't already have a waxy coating on the leaves. Some of my neps already have this coating while others used to have it but don't anymore. How do you greenhouse harden your plants?

    -D. Lybrand
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    You don't want to do it my way, but I actually just expose them and hope for the best! Many older leaves will get burned or dried out a bit, but if you keep them watered and growing, new leaves replace the older ones and before you know it, you have a plant that is accustomed to growing in less than a protected environment.

    M
    Morticia:\"Sic gorgiamus allos subjectatos nunc, 'We would gladly feast on those who try to subdue us.' Not just pretty words. but words to live by!\"

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    Greenhouse hardening is the term used for plants coming out of flask and into the greenhouse. Are you guys referring to hardening the plants? For plants coming out of a greenhouse or "soft" conditions, to a harder growing environment?

    We do what Michael does, just throw them out there and hope they adjust.

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    Would the technique of putting the new potted plant in a sealed baggie, and then opening it 10%, followed by a further 10% each day until the 10 or so days are up, work?

    Cheers,

    Joe

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    Trent- I am referring to regular hardening, I guess. That sounds about right for what I am trying to achieve.

    I will try acclimating my plants to the outdoors, then. Maybe it will toughen them up. Thanks, guys.

    -D. Lybrand
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  6. #6
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    I probably wouldn't call it hardening at all but that is more symantics. With plants from a lab they are lacking the waxy layer on the leaf surface. Acclimating would be more appropriate for when your simply changing the environment and the plant has to make adjustments to compensate.
    Such as increasing root mass to handle higher transpiration rates in a warmer or lower humidity environment.

    It is certainly a good idea when possible to do it gradually. Less stress will help the plant acclimate faster. Using a baggie or something that can be controlled will work. Careful observation too! You can simply open it a little more each day watching to make sure it is not overdone. Or you can do it by exposing the plant to the new conditions fully for gradually increasing time, allowing it to recover inbetween. With Nepenthes watch for droopping of young leaves/pitcher lids, rolling of the leaf edges underneath the leaves, droopping softening of the leaf tissue. Severe cases of course, wrinkled leaves, dried leaf edges etc. Don't expect the pitchers to last even if your really careful.
    Tony
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    Joe,
    Rather than the baggie, when we throw them out there they still get misted frequently and the general area around the bench is kept wet-but never too much to the plants. Also, seedlings or small tc plants go in more shade, and when they reach a certain size, or when they're growing stongly, they get moved to a brighter situation. We grow some of our DeRoose plants intentionally hard, so they adapt well to 'patio horticulture' here in south Florida.

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