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Thread: N. viking pics

  1. #9

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    N. bicalcarata is endemic to Borneo. I don't see how N. sp. viking has traits of N. bicalcarata or N. ampullaria. It is, however, strikingly similiar to N. rafflesiana in some regards.
    Having said that, I am partial to the theory that it is a new species.

    Oh, and very nice plants, Trent. =)

  2. #10
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    no species in the genus have a dormancy.

  3. #11

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    I think he's referring to rowanae's habit of dying back in the dry season, and shooting from the base when the growing season starts.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

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    Its a great looking plant,shame i have no chance of growing lowlanders though [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_h_32.gif[/img]
    Bye for now Julian

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    Viking is from a monsoonal climate, and does experience a dry season. This may be the reason for the huge rhizomes. I don't know if they die back completely in their native habitat, but they produce tons of basal shoots through the growing season.
    Yes, they are round and squat like rafflesiana, but raff does not grow on the remote islands of the Andaman Sea where the extreme forms (the ones that are really fat and round) are found.
    The new growth on a Viking basal shoot has a thin leaf texture and fimbriated margins or leaf edge, we think this immature growth harkens back to its mirabilis origins. N. rafflesiana (and hybrids with it) have a totally different growth habit and also where are the raff spots on the pitcher? We've never seen a raff hybrid without the raff spots (no hybrid has the color and texture of those Vikings).
    We have three different crosses of raff x mirabilis, and the progeny doesn't even look close to Viking. Nor does Viking resemble a hookeriana. They are their own thing. I wouldn't be surprised if there are more than a few unknown Nep forms scattered throughout remote locations of tropical Asia, even in the lowlands.

  6. #14

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    Hey, do you have a pic of the entire platn? I was wondering whats the pitcher to leaf size ratio...have you heard of uppers on this plant before? How about the max size it gets? Is the plant something small (generally) ? By the way, nice pics, its quite a cool plant and I'll definitely want one when it comes into the market!
    Thanks

  7. #15
    fly-catchers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (chesara @ July 25 2005,4:16)]Its a great looking plant,shame i have no chance of growing lowlanders though [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_h_32.gif[/img]
    Bye for now Julian
    You should try a few lowlanders on your kitchen or bathroom windowsill Julian. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]
    My N. rafflesiana, truncata & bicalcarata are doing fine. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]
    They slow done in the winter and don't grow as fast as if they were under true lowland conditions but seem quite happy.

    Nice N. viking- good to see it survived after all.

    cheers

    bill

  8. #16

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    >Hey, do you have a pic of the entire platn? I was wondering >whats the pitcher to leaf size ratio...

    It varies, but is fairly typical. I hate to use this comparison, but the ratio is about like a raff. Some of the small plants can produce fair large pitchers in relation to overall plant mass. Much of this has to do with cultural conditions-ie. constant high humidity=big pitchers.

    >have you heard of uppers on this plant before?
    Yes. They are elongated versions of the lowers.
    >How about the max size it gets?
    Our plants are not yet full grown. They are all from rhizome cuttings, so we're waiting to see just how big they can get. The new basal shoots can start out as a little rosette, looking like a mirabilis, but each new growth gets larger. Some of the red forms show red coloration to the stems and leaf mid-vein.

    >Is the plant something small (generally) ?
    This is where we believe they will be of great interest to horticulturists in general. Because of the rhizome-like root mass that spreads horizontally, it seems like they could be trimmed back and kept in a more miniature stage of development, or let them go and..who knows? The pitchers are constantly improving as they grow out and become more established. Another nice feature is trap retention. We counted seven nice pitchers on one plant that is far from being full grown. Again, a characteristic of mirabilis (but also alata, bicalcarata and ampullaria).

    > By the way, nice pics, its quite a cool plant and I'll definitely want one when it comes into the market!
    Michelle took the pics with our Konica-Minolta. She's developed a real eye for good angles, lighting, backgrounds-all they key ingredients of a professional photo!
    'Vikings' are really cool, and do show remarkable variation. I could see collectors just specializing in them, or having a seperate little collection of Viking forms. I have definitely fallen for them! We have already got quite a bunch going, so PM me if you want more info.
    Julian, like Bill said, if you can grow rafflesiana, you should do fine with 'em!

    Trent

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