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Thread: Mosquitoe breeding!

  1. #1

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    To my horror today, I found two of my rafflesiana squat red pitchers playing host to about 6 mosquitoe larva each. In my haste to get rid of them, I poured the larvae out...I should have collected and identified them first (or maybe feed them to my bettas!) Sorry I cant describe what sp. of larvae but , here in Singapore , I dont think the Health Inspectors would check...they will fine me first the moment they find I'm breeding Mosquitoes, then only ID the species!...and I think my nep collection would have to go if that ever happens [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_k_ani_32.gif[/img]

    Getting back to subject, I need help on this! And please dont advice me to check each individual pitcher - even if its only one check a week, it is very difficult. I will try to do that for now, until I find another method of prevention.
    Does anyone have experience of this?

    For your information, the pitcher fluids were Not Putrified, it was as normal as ever, just ants and a cricket in one, ants only in the other

    I know that mosquitoe larvae are natural inhabitants of pitchers in the wild. But I think C. Clarke mentioned something about the pitchers being too harsh for viruses like dengue to survive. Can anyone verify that?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    boomfiziks1's Avatar
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    I did a little search and came across this website:
    http://www.pondsandgardens.com/catalog/watertreat.htm
    I'm not sure if it'll work. You may have to do a little experimenting.

    You may also want to do a Google search on "plant friendly mosquito removal". Hopefully someone out there may be able to give better advice.

    Good luck and let us know how various ideas work.

    Have a great day!
    Dwight

  3. #3

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    I`ve tried those "dunks" but they didn`t work for me.
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/pondboy/Neps/Neps%20sig..JPG[/img]

  4. #4

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    Well, for saucers with water you can add a drop of vegetable oil, which prevents the mosquito larvae from breathing. Not sure how a Nepenthes pitcher would react on a treatment like that... I am not eager to try - but who knows?
    In Singapore even unvoluntary mosquito breeders are punishable? Wow. Sounds cruel like always - but makes actually a lot of sense.
    In the worst case you'll need to screen off your pitcher plants then, the ants will still find them.
    In my 99% screened greenhouse I have every morning about 5 mosquitos - which is less than in our 100% screened house. I go early when it is cold and they are still slow - so I kill them within 2 minutes and can then focus on my plants.
    Volker
    http://pitcher-plants.com/bannersmall.jpg Manila, Philippines, Elev: 80 m, 24-33 C

    Tropical outdoor growers: Please visit our Carnivorous Plants in the tropics forum

  5. #5
    zappafan's Avatar
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    I've read a traveller to Africa once used the mucilage from the opuntia cactus (Prickly Pear) and it glazed the entire surface of a pond suffocating the mosquitoes. Supposedly the effect lasts for an entire year. I do not know how many leaves of the cactus were used.

  6. #6

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    It only takes one, ZF. The prickly pear has many uses. One is using the juices of the prickly pear to coat rawhide and letting it dry. Doing that, and cutting in the right places, you have a servicable, waterproof, Native American "suitcase". The juice in water would make an impenetrable barrier for mosquito larvae to breathe through. Though insects can still be food, falling into the pitcher. Safer than oil I would say.



    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

  7. #7
    zappafan's Avatar
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    Thanks Bugweed, I just learned something. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

  8. #8
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Steve, didn't you mention using the non-stick spray, called PAM?

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